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Building in Googong

By Googong - 16 November 2014 39

My partner an I are looking to build in Googong. Can any one recommend a good builder or list ones I should be staying away from?

Has anyone had any experience with Classic Constructions?

What’s Your opinion?


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39 Responses to
Building in Googong
ElleZed 3:06 pm 01 Dec 14

Maya123 said :

ElleZed said :

Yep, I’ve used Classic just this year, excellent experience, very quality build and finish!

But with the design you got, how often do you need to heat the house? Or worse still, was air conditioning part of the packaging? I ask this, because with the right design, air conditioning is NEVER needed in Canberra, and heating rarely.

I guess i wasnt really pushing too much on this sort of stuff but they did help / include, im sure I couldve gone further and being a custom build they did help with dos donts for this sort of thing.

Isulation offered in their package was good (had the option to upgrade further). Ducted gas was part of the package, I asked for ducted evap to go in. Double glazing was within my reach so put that in the east and north facing living rooms, was best idea!

I’ll mention that ive never built before so nothing to guage against, but in talking to others building roughly same time I felt I had vastly less issues / stress, anecodotal perhaps?.

Maya123 12:11 pm 01 Dec 14

ElleZed said :

Yep, I’ve used Classic just this year, excellent experience, very quality build and finish!

But with the design you got, how often do you need to heat the house? Or worse still, was air conditioning part of the packaging? I ask this, because with the right design, air conditioning is NEVER needed in Canberra, and heating rarely.

dungfungus 7:40 am 01 Dec 14

It is a shame that Googong didn’t include planning for a regional/light rail into Canberra via Jerrabomberra.
How many cars would that take off the roads Mr Rattenbury?

ElleZed 9:50 pm 30 Nov 14

Yep, I’ve used Classic just this year, excellent experience, very quality build and finish!

Maya123 7:18 pm 30 Nov 14

Maya123 said :

Googong said :

Hi Maya123,

My partner and I are planning on building an energy house, as we don’t like the idea of having to take out a small loan in order to pay for bills. The way prices are rising these days I don’t think it will be to long before my last comment is reality.
Was wondering who you ended building with?
No matter who we end up going with we will be pushing for an energy efficient design.

You won’t regret building an energy efficient house. My house is very cheap to run. I have full length double glazed windows on the north side and minimal windows on the other sides. Make sure the double glazed windows have thermal breaks or wooden frames for insulation, and sufficient gap between the glass. 12mm plus. Wooden frames are probably the best insulation, if you like the upkeep and that look. I prefer the lighter look of aluminium. Mine have thermal breaks, but I suspect this could have been better. Many cheaper double glazed widows don’t have thermal breaks. The quality of double glazing is not all the same. The house must have sufficient mass to keep a stable temperature inside. An (insulated) slab is not enough in Canberra. I visited a display home once and the salesman was telling me all that was needed in Canberra was a concrete slab, good insulation and north facing windows; that the internal walls didn’t need to be solid concrete, brick, stone, etc. It was a sunny day and that house was cold, and he was brazen enough in the face of contrary evidence, to tell me that mis-truth. In Canberra internal mass is needed. Every internal wall in my house in concrete. My external walls are double concrete, with sandwiched insulation between.
I have solar chimneys on the roof, which I open in summer to cool the house, and a west window and an east window to get flow through ventilation. I have security screens on these windows, so they can be left open at night. My refrigerator has a ventilation hole behind it to let the heat escape and reduce its running costs. Lights are all fluorescent, which will in time be replaced with LED. (Hopefully by then the colour temperature of LEDs will improve. To me the cool LEDs are too cool, and the warm LEDs too warm in colour. I prefer the colour of the cool fluorescent bulbs at present to the LEDs.)
My stove and oven can be turned off at the wall to save waste of any ‘trickle’ electricity, as can other electrical appliances. An example of this ‘unseen trickle’ electricity is my washing machine. Off, but still on at the wall, with no lights on, it uses 8 watts of power all the time, unless it is switched off at the wall.
Solar hot water saves a lot of power. I only need the booster about one month a year. I have a tube system and I could probably improve this by adding more tubes.
Other things to consider are orientation of the house on the block, shading from neighbouring houses and vegetation. Single storey is usually more energy efficient too.
There are several firms doing solar houses and will give advice, but do your research too. From experience, the advice given is not always suitable.
Locally, TT architecture I believe does solar design, as does Strine design. There are probably others.

I should have added that pale colours for external walls and roof are recommended, and darker colours inside.

Maya123 7:16 pm 30 Nov 14

Googong said :

Hi Maya123,

My partner and I are planning on building an energy house, as we don’t like the idea of having to take out a small loan in order to pay for bills. The way prices are rising these days I don’t think it will be to long before my last comment is reality.
Was wondering who you ended building with?
No matter who we end up going with we will be pushing for an energy efficient design.

You won’t regret building an energy efficient house. My house is very cheap to run. I have full length double glazed windows on the north side and minimal windows on the other sides. Make sure the double glazed windows have thermal breaks or wooden frames for insulation, and sufficient gap between the glass. 12mm plus. Wooden frames are probably the best insulation, if you like the upkeep and that look. I prefer the lighter look of aluminium. Mine have thermal breaks, but I suspect this could have been better. Many cheaper double glazed widows don’t have thermal breaks. The quality of double glazing is not all the same. The house must have sufficient mass to keep a stable temperature inside. An (insulated) slab is not enough in Canberra. I visited a display home once and the salesman was telling me all that was needed in Canberra was a concrete slab, good insulation and north facing windows; that the internal walls didn’t need to be solid concrete, brick, stone, etc. It was a sunny day and that house was cold, and he was brazen enough in the face of contrary evidence, to tell me that mis-truth. In Canberra internal mass is needed. Every internal wall in my house in concrete. My external walls are double concrete, with sandwiched insulation between.
I have solar chimneys on the roof, which I open in summer to cool the house, and a west window and an east window to get flow through ventilation. I have security screens on these windows, so they can be left open at night. My refrigerator has a ventilation hole behind it to let the heat escape and reduce its running costs. Lights are all fluorescent, which will in time be replaced with LED. (Hopefully by then the colour temperature of LEDs will improve. To me the cool LEDs are too cool, and the warm LEDs too warm in colour. I prefer the colour of the cool fluorescent bulbs at present to the LEDs.)
My stove and oven can be turned off at the wall to save waste of any ‘trickle’ electricity, as can other electrical appliances. An example of this ‘unseen trickle’ electricity is my washing machine. Off, but still on at the wall, with no lights on, it uses 8 watts of power all the time, unless it is switched off at the wall.
Solar hot water saves a lot of power. I only need the booster about one month a year. I have a tube system and I could probably improve this by adding more tubes.
Other things to consider are orientation of the house on the block, shading from neighbouring houses and vegetation. Single storey is usually more energy efficient too.
There are several firms doing solar houses and will give advice, but do your research too. From experience, the advice given is not always suitable.
Locally, TT architecture I believe does solar design, as does Strine design. There are probably others.

Googong 11:24 am 30 Nov 14

Hi Maya123,

My partner and I are planning on building an energy house, as we don’t like the idea of having to take out a small loan in order to pay for bills. The way prices are rising these days I don’t think it will be to long before my last comment is reality.
Was wondering who you ended building with?
No matter who we end up going with we will be pushing for an energy efficient design.

Maya123 1:03 pm 24 Nov 14

Googong said :

Cheers guys thanks for the feedback.
At this stage we are still thinking of going with Classic Constructions. Has anyone had any experience with them at all as I haven’t found to many posts mentioning them as of yet.

Nice looking styles, but there is more to consider when building a house than just looks. There is energy efficiency If the houses come with heating and cooling as standard, despite what the salesperson will tell you, that’s a very good indication they aren’t very energy efficient, because in Canberra, houses can be built that don’t need heating and cooling as ‘standard’. There are designs that will (as good as) eliminate heating and cooling bills. As I said, I have had no heating or cooling bills for the last year, and my house keeps a comfortable temperature. Take yesterday with its 39C as an example. It was hot outside, but my house was so comfortably cool to walk into. I don’t have air-condition. I don’t need the expense of air-conditioning. As you are building you have a chance to built properly. Don’t throw this opportunity away. And whatever you build, DON’T have a black roof. Have a pale coloured roof.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 8:43 am 24 Nov 14

Maya123 said :

Whoever you get to build, do pick a design of a house that will minimise heating and cooling costs. You can build houses that need no cooling and only rarely need to be heated. My heating and cooling bills this year have been zero. The only heating besides the sun, is a wood fired stove, which is only occasionally lit, and it runs on free waste wood. Last winter it was never lit in the day and only a few times at night (ie, most nights it was not needed). Hence I paid nothing for heating. I did though pay for the booster for the hot water for about a month. The rest of the year the booster is not needed. I could improve this situation if I added more tubes.
The costs of future (rising) power bills should be taken into consideration when choosing a house design. Too many people ignore this.

It’s not just the power bills, but rather the level of comfort that needs to be considered. It really is far, far nicer to have a home that seems cool on hot days and warm on cool days than to have to constantly blow hot and cold air around.

Southmouth 9:07 pm 23 Nov 14

I used Regal Homes. Moved in at the beginning of the year. I know they build in Googong as they were starting some there when they finished mine. I really couldn’t be happier. Our floor plan etc and the job was exactly on budget and 2 months early.

Maya123 7:06 pm 23 Nov 14

Googong said :

Cheers guys thanks for the feedback.
At this stage we are still thinking of going with Classic Constructions. Has anyone had any experience with them at all as I haven’t found to many posts mentioning them as of yet.

“Classic Constructions”
Nice looking styles, but there is more to consider when building a house than just looks. These houses don’t look very energy efficient. If they come with heating and cooling as standard, despite what the salesperson will tell you, that’s a very good indication they aren’t, because in Canberra, houses can be built that don’t need heating and cooling as ‘standard’. The styles I see in the photographs also doesn’t look very energy efficient.You will get a heating bill, and possibly a cooling bill too. There are designs that will (as good as) eliminate heating and cooling bills. As I said, I have had no heating or cooling bills for the last year, and my house keeps a comfortable temperature. Take today as an example. It’s hot outside, but my house is so comfortably cool to walk into. I don’t have air-condition. I don’t need the expense of air-conditioning. As you are building you have a chance to built properly. Don’t throw this opportunity away. And whatever you build, DON’T have a black roof. Have a pale coloured roof.

Googong 3:56 pm 23 Nov 14

Cheers guys thanks for the feedback.
At this stage we are still thinking of going with Classic Constructions. Has anyone had any experience with them at all as I haven’t found to many posts mentioning them as of yet.

curmudgery 4:15 pm 17 Nov 14

I’ve had some work done by Country Builders in Queanbeyan and am happy to recommend them.

I completely agree with Maya123’s comments – houses, cars, software … people seem to look no further than the initial cost. Maintenance and upkeep can keep you poor.

Maya123 2:08 pm 17 Nov 14

Whoever you get to build, do pick a design of a house that will minimise heating and cooling costs. You can build houses that need no cooling and only rarely need to be heated. My heating and cooling bills this year have been zero. The only heating besides the sun, is a wood fired stove, which is only occasionally lit, and it runs on free waste wood. Last winter it was never lit in the day and only a few times at night (ie, most nights it was not needed). Hence I paid nothing for heating. I did though pay for the booster for the hot water for about a month. The rest of the year the booster is not needed. I could improve this situation if I added more tubes.
The costs of future (rising) power bills should be taken into consideration when choosing a house design. Too many people ignore this.

OzChick 12:36 pm 17 Nov 14

There is an extensive discussion about building in Googong in the Home One forum. You might even come across some of your neighbours. Good luck.

http://forum.homeone.com.au/viewtopic.php?t=62365

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