Bus travel a right or priviledge? [With poll]

creative_canberran 9 March 2012 74

The ABC reports today that an ACTION bus driver kicked 15 students from Telopea Park School off a bus.

Apparently he was not pleased with their behaviour, though there is no indication of whether the behaviour was criminal or dangerous to the driver or other passengers.

It seems that in survey after survey in Australia’s capital cities, anti-social behaviour by some passengers is a chief complaint among public transport users.

So is bus travel for students really a right that can’t be negated by their behaviour?

Shouldn’t the safety and enjoyment of fellow passengers be paramount?

Was the driver wrong, or was he just teaching them an important lesson?

Kicking school kids off buses

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74 Responses to Bus travel a right or priviledge? [With poll]
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GardeningGirl GardeningGirl 1:45 pm 13 Mar 12

TheDancingDjinn said :

GardeningGirl said :

Anybody thought about distance? We changed schools due to behaviour management problems at the local school and I knew plenty of other parents who made that choice both in our school area and in other areas, so the new school just wasn’t close enough to walk. Growing up walking to school I was used to the idea and liked the idea, but it just wasn’t doable, it made me pretty mad at the time to go from the morning and afternoon strolls I’d imagined to the mum’s taxi routine and associated petrol costs, but the civilised atmosphere of the new school quickly made up for it. I imagine with the school closures that’s the case for even more families now who have to go to a different suburb unlike when I was a kid and you typically went to a school within your own suburb with no major roads to cross.

This is my problem also – I live really close to my neighbourhood school, and i wanted my son to go there, but my son has mild Autism, and needs a special program. The school gave all the spots to out of area people so now i have to drive from Belconnen to Turner every morning in peakhour traffic. I would love to have gone to the local school, but as i was told about by the princapal – the people who were given the spots (only 8 of them) needed to go there, as the parents friends kids go there…. and?.. i don’t care how many friends they have, i live locally and i should have been given the spot – 3 of them are in the Turner School catchment and still my kid has to go to their local school for education. Now i love the Turner School, they are wonderful – but i really would have liked to have the experience of being able to walk my kid to school, sadly i don’t have that option.

Sorry to hear that, but I’m glad the school you’re at is working out well otherwise.
We first asked at the next nearest school, which happily was walking distance too, but they said no, not because they had no places but because they had to keep sufficient places available for locals. I thought locals are guaranteed a place, sounds like poor planning?

Using buses was never considered by us, not because of concern about the driver but because of concern about the kids. Even on school excursions when teachers accompanied the kids you could rely on there being one or two who mucked up.

ML-585 ML-585 1:07 pm 13 Mar 12

Stevian said :

damien haas said :

I tag off with my myway card at a stop *before* i arrive at my stop. You just have to make sure you sit or stand near the scanner at the middle of the bus. Bus stops, whip your card out and tag off. That way i can collect all my bags of shopping, corral my twelve children and unfold my pram – without having to pause on the way out the door to hear a satisfying beep.

I do have sleepless nights worrying about the number crunchers in TAMS puzzling over their stats though.

So many factual errors in that. Ride a bus sometime to achieve a minimal level of verisimilitude.

Can’t see any factual errors (apart from Damien having twelve children – although if he did, he should be training the older ones to collect the pram and carry the shopping!)

TheDancingDjinn TheDancingDjinn 3:09 pm 12 Mar 12

GardeningGirl said :

Anybody thought about distance? We changed schools due to behaviour management problems at the local school and I knew plenty of other parents who made that choice both in our school area and in other areas, so the new school just wasn’t close enough to walk. Growing up walking to school I was used to the idea and liked the idea, but it just wasn’t doable, it made me pretty mad at the time to go from the morning and afternoon strolls I’d imagined to the mum’s taxi routine and associated petrol costs, but the civilised atmosphere of the new school quickly made up for it. I imagine with the school closures that’s the case for even more families now who have to go to a different suburb unlike when I was a kid and you typically went to a school within your own suburb with no major roads to cross.

This is my problem also – I live really close to my neighbourhood school, and i wanted my son to go there, but my son has mild Autism, and needs a special program. The school gave all the spots to out of area people so now i have to drive from Belconnen to Turner every morning in peakhour traffic. I would love to have gone to the local school, but as i was told about by the princapal – the people who were given the spots (only 8 of them) needed to go there, as the parents friends kids go there…. and?.. i don’t care how many friends they have, i live locally and i should have been given the spot – 3 of them are in the Turner School catchment and still my kid has to go to their local school for education. Now i love the Turner School, they are wonderful – but i really would have liked to have the experience of being able to walk my kid to school, sadly i don’t have that option.

astrojax astrojax 2:35 pm 12 Mar 12

Devil_n_Disquiz said :

astrojax said :

there’s no ‘d’ in privilege…

….without being privvy…
….passenger wasn’t to pleased….

Seeing as we are playing the grammar game 🙂

touche! [departs contrite…]

GardeningGirl GardeningGirl 1:33 pm 12 Mar 12

Anybody thought about distance? We changed schools due to behaviour management problems at the local school and I knew plenty of other parents who made that choice both in our school area and in other areas, so the new school just wasn’t close enough to walk. Growing up walking to school I was used to the idea and liked the idea, but it just wasn’t doable, it made me pretty mad at the time to go from the morning and afternoon strolls I’d imagined to the mum’s taxi routine and associated petrol costs, but the civilised atmosphere of the new school quickly made up for it. I imagine with the school closures that’s the case for even more families now who have to go to a different suburb unlike when I was a kid and you typically went to a school within your own suburb with no major roads to cross.

Watson Watson 11:16 am 12 Mar 12

bryansworld said :

I fear for my kids in the herd of overprotective parents driving around in their monster trucks around every school morning and afternoon. I wonder why so many kids are fat?

Ironically they are most likely to be the loudest whingers about how it is too dangerous for their kids to walk to school because of the traffic. Honestly, sometimes I despair about this collective madness.

Also, statistically the odds of your child being killed in traffic when they are walking or cycling and of them being killed when riding in a car are pretty much exactly the same. So parents driving their kids to school because it is too dangerous for them to walk/take the bus are deluding themselves.

bryansworld bryansworld 9:58 am 12 Mar 12

Watson said :

poetix said :

Jethro said :

Watson said :

fabforty said :

milkman said :

aceofspades said :

If a bus driver threw my crying 6yo off a bus I would hunt him down a belt the absolute crap out of him.

As would I.

If you let your six year old travel on the bus alone, I think it is both of you who need a belting.

Cue for the helicopter parents…

I agree with you Watson. There’s no reason a 6 year old can’t cant the bus home. I was catching the bus home from school from Day 1 Grade 1. I was 3 months past 5.

Granted, once the bus broke down and I was scared of being lost forever in middle-suburban Brisbane, so I hitchhiked home with a blonde lady in a red sports car, but in general, I agree with you.

While I’m glad you had such a nice lady pick you up (and I bet you’ve been searching for her ever since, in some way or another) there is no way that a child below ten should be catching even a school bus on his or her own. As I’ve posted before here, children under that age simply can not understand traffic and are likely to step out into the road. Letting a five or six year old catch a bus on his or her own makes about as much sense as letting them have a tea party with dishwasher tablets representing cakes.

Letting any primary school child catch a non-school (general) bus is simply irresponsible, and putting convenience before safety. I know I’ll be called over-protective, but there are real dangers for children on their own.

By eleven, I was catching the bus into the city in Melbourne and the train to Flemington for the Royal Melbourne Show on my own, and that is, frankly, quite ridiculous.

The best option is for a child to walk to school with an adult, but given fewer people automatically use the local school (and the extent to which both parents work) this is becoming rarer.

That noise is the background is a Blackhawk, by the way.

If you have not taught your child to not just step out into the road by the age of 6, what have you been teaching them all those years? There are unfortunately lots of kids who do not understand traffic, but it is not because they are not capable but because their parents haven’t bothered spending the time and effort on instructing them. Convenience is not teaching your kids how to stay safe in the real world.

Anywho, wasn’t this a school bus?

+1. I fear for my kids in the herd of overprotective parents driving around in their monster trucks around every school morning and afternoon. I wonder why so many kids are fat?

Gerry-Built Gerry-Built 9:05 am 12 Mar 12

milkman said :

aceofspades said :

If a bus driver threw my crying 6yo off a bus I would hunt him down a belt the absolute crap out of him.

As would I.

I bet your kids can do no wrong, either… I suspect so, with the attitude they are growing up under the guidance of…

Innovation Innovation 8:43 am 12 Mar 12

I like the idea of pulling over until the culprits own up and apologise to everyone on the bus. I also like the idea of taking the children back to school and handing them over to a teacher. Also, if they use the bus then they have an identity card and the driver can record the details for ACTION to notify the school and/or parents later. As punishment, perhaps the parents might like to send the kids to a depot for a day to help clean and repair buses.

Putting WiFi on the buses (if it’s possible) might give the older ones something to do so that they aren’t bored and cause trouble.

Kicking children off the buses, especially young ones, seems a bit extreme. Call in the inspectors or police if necessary but don’t kick anyone off unless they are violent. Even then I would expect that the violent ones are years 10 or above.

poetix poetix 8:36 am 12 Mar 12

Watson said :

If you have not taught your child to not just step out into the road by the age of 6, what have you been teaching them all those years? There are unfortunately lots of kids who do not understand traffic, but it is not because they are not capable but because their parents haven’t bothered spending the time and effort on instructing them. Convenience is not teaching your kids how to stay safe in the real world.

Anywho, wasn’t this a school bus?

Yes, it was a school bus. I just progressed to the ‘my fears as a parent’ stage, away from the ‘let’s discuss the issue in the post’ stage. I agree that children should know how to cross the road, but perhaps I am just too nervous to allow a primary school kid to do it on his or her own.

I know a lot of other parents feel the way I do too, hence the awful scrums in carparks after school finishes.

Watson Watson 12:53 am 12 Mar 12

poetix said :

Jethro said :

Watson said :

fabforty said :

milkman said :

aceofspades said :

If a bus driver threw my crying 6yo off a bus I would hunt him down a belt the absolute crap out of him.

As would I.

If you let your six year old travel on the bus alone, I think it is both of you who need a belting.

Cue for the helicopter parents…

I agree with you Watson. There’s no reason a 6 year old can’t cant the bus home. I was catching the bus home from school from Day 1 Grade 1. I was 3 months past 5.

Granted, once the bus broke down and I was scared of being lost forever in middle-suburban Brisbane, so I hitchhiked home with a blonde lady in a red sports car, but in general, I agree with you.

While I’m glad you had such a nice lady pick you up (and I bet you’ve been searching for her ever since, in some way or another) there is no way that a child below ten should be catching even a school bus on his or her own. As I’ve posted before here, children under that age simply can not understand traffic and are likely to step out into the road. Letting a five or six year old catch a bus on his or her own makes about as much sense as letting them have a tea party with dishwasher tablets representing cakes.

Letting any primary school child catch a non-school (general) bus is simply irresponsible, and putting convenience before safety. I know I’ll be called over-protective, but there are real dangers for children on their own.

By eleven, I was catching the bus into the city in Melbourne and the train to Flemington for the Royal Melbourne Show on my own, and that is, frankly, quite ridiculous.

The best option is for a child to walk to school with an adult, but given fewer people automatically use the local school (and the extent to which both parents work) this is becoming rarer.

That noise is the background is a Blackhawk, by the way.

If you have not taught your child to not just step out into the road by the age of 6, what have you been teaching them all those years? There are unfortunately lots of kids who do not understand traffic, but it is not because they are not capable but because their parents haven’t bothered spending the time and effort on instructing them. Convenience is not teaching your kids how to stay safe in the real world.

Anywho, wasn’t this a school bus?

poetix poetix 9:35 pm 11 Mar 12

Jethro said :

Watson said :

fabforty said :

milkman said :

aceofspades said :

If a bus driver threw my crying 6yo off a bus I would hunt him down a belt the absolute crap out of him.

As would I.

If you let your six year old travel on the bus alone, I think it is both of you who need a belting.

Cue for the helicopter parents…

I agree with you Watson. There’s no reason a 6 year old can’t cant the bus home. I was catching the bus home from school from Day 1 Grade 1. I was 3 months past 5.

Granted, once the bus broke down and I was scared of being lost forever in middle-suburban Brisbane, so I hitchhiked home with a blonde lady in a red sports car, but in general, I agree with you.

While I’m glad you had such a nice lady pick you up (and I bet you’ve been searching for her ever since, in some way or another) there is no way that a child below ten should be catching even a school bus on his or her own. As I’ve posted before here, children under that age simply can not understand traffic and are likely to step out into the road. Letting a five or six year old catch a bus on his or her own makes about as much sense as letting them have a tea party with dishwasher tablets representing cakes.

Letting any primary school child catch a non-school (general) bus is simply irresponsible, and putting convenience before safety. I know I’ll be called over-protective, but there are real dangers for children on their own.

By eleven, I was catching the bus into the city in Melbourne and the train to Flemington for the Royal Melbourne Show on my own, and that is, frankly, quite ridiculous.

The best option is for a child to walk to school with an adult, but given fewer people automatically use the local school (and the extent to which both parents work) this is becoming rarer.

That noise is the background is a Blackhawk, by the way.

Jethro Jethro 8:07 pm 11 Mar 12

Watson said :

fabforty said :

milkman said :

aceofspades said :

If a bus driver threw my crying 6yo off a bus I would hunt him down a belt the absolute crap out of him.

As would I.

If you let your six year old travel on the bus alone, I think it is both of you who need a belting.

Cue for the helicopter parents…

I agree with you Watson. There’s no reason a 6 year old can’t cant the bus home. I was catching the bus home from school from Day 1 Grade 1. I was 3 months past 5.

Granted, once the bus broke down and I was scared of being lost forever in middle-suburban Brisbane, so I hitchhiked home with a blonde lady in a red sports car, but in general, I agree with you.

TheDancingDjinn TheDancingDjinn 7:11 pm 11 Mar 12

Watson said :

fabforty said :

milkman said :

aceofspades said :

If a bus driver threw my crying 6yo off a bus I would hunt him down a belt the absolute crap out of him.

As would I.

If you let your six year old travel on the bus alone, I think it is both of you who need a belting.

Cue for the helicopter parents…

No he’s right – 6 yr olds don’t need to ride the bus, when your little and in your first years of school,i think kids should be driven – i don’t care if anyone else wants to put their kindy or 1st grader on the bus, but i personally wouldn’t.

Brianna Brianna 7:06 pm 11 Mar 12

James_Ryan said :

Two words:

Daniel Morcombe.

Still think kicking kids off school buses is a good idea?

That gave me shivers. It’s not okay to abuse the driver but it’s also not okay to kick the kids off the bus. A previous comment stated that the driver took them back to the school. I think that may be the best move. The kids have to explain why it happened, the driver has not ‘abandoned’ them, the kids are safe and the driver is safe. It will certainly make the little toe rags think twice about their behaviour.

Watson Watson 6:14 pm 11 Mar 12

fabforty said :

milkman said :

aceofspades said :

If a bus driver threw my crying 6yo off a bus I would hunt him down a belt the absolute crap out of him.

As would I.

If you let your six year old travel on the bus alone, I think it is both of you who need a belting.

Cue for the helicopter parents…

fabforty fabforty 4:54 pm 11 Mar 12

milkman said :

aceofspades said :

If a bus driver threw my crying 6yo off a bus I would hunt him down a belt the absolute crap out of him.

As would I.

If you let your six year old travel on the bus alone, I think it is both of you who need a belting.

iGonePostal iGonePostal 2:03 pm 11 Mar 12

I am used to traveling on the same bus as Telopea kids, and I can assure you that they more than likely deserved it.

milkman milkman 1:36 pm 11 Mar 12

aceofspades said :

If a bus driver threw my crying 6yo off a bus I would hunt him down a belt the absolute crap out of him.

As would I.

Stevian Stevian 12:06 pm 11 Mar 12

TheDancingDjinn said :

damien haas said :

Having caught the bus from Gungahlin to Belconnen on one of the magical mystery routes as the bus tours through Nicholls and Evatt, i have seen children of primary school age board the bus, pay, behave and exit the bus – shock horror – on their own!

The fact that society infantilises children, when they should encourage independence and resilience is sad. I could count on one hand the number of times i was driven to school.

Society makes kids eternal infants? LOL – tell that the freaks selling g strings to girls that are 7-10 yrs old and push up bras too

ok – whatever. We actually should be making our kids stay kids longer.

That’s actually the sexualization of children which is a totally different problem.

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