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Kings Highway. Have they learned nothing?

By Tecko12 12 March 2012 118

I have a question and im sure many people have the same one.

After the horrific weekend we have had on the kings highway, People still dont seem to learn anything.

Driving home from Batemans bay today, i passed a further 2 car accidents around 10.30 – 12.00 ish.

One of them at the same place were the most recent accidents have occured and one between Bungendore and Braidwood.

But what shocked me is that there is always 1 person who cant stand to be behind another car, so they speed out into the other lane, try to overtake as many cars as possible and then cut off whoever they can to get back into the correct lane to avoid oncoming traffic.

Why cant people wait and be patient. Everyone else has to. And what really got to me is that it was a mother driving her family of 3 kids. Wouldent people learn.

Although the road is in poor condition now, it is still fine to drive if you drive to the condition but people risking their own lives and their familys to jump a few car spaces ahead, i just do not understand.

What’s Your opinion?


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Kings Highway. Have they learned nothing?
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Snarky 10:48 am 19 Mar 12

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

…Snarky – did you see many motorcyclists on the way home? We saw quite a few, and most of them seemed very sensible.

Now that you mention it… no. Which is unusual – means either that they either weren’t there, or they were riding conservatively and didn’t stand out.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 10:40 am 19 Mar 12

Snarky said :

Seconding VY above. We also spent the weekend at the coast, and saw the Clyde in both the best and worst conditions (9pm in the rain on Friday, contrasting with fine and sunny Sunday afternoon). The road is fine. It’s well made and, on actually closely looking at it from the passenger seat for a change, it’s wider than I thought in many places and in pretty good repair. It has one major issue, and that’s the fact it traverses a very steep, if relatively short, mountain, and no amount of remedial work will change that fact.

Drivers for the most part were as VY described – go with the flow, drive to the conditions etc. Of the three really stupid incidents I saw all three were NSW plates, which genuinely surprised me. Two were tradies utes (well, perhaps not such a surprise) and a small red sports thing with a P plate (even less a surprise) driving like he’d lost the will to live on such a wet, dark and windy road.

I know there are accidents all along the highway, but it really is that 5km + 3km stretch down the Clyde that terrifies. I wonder if it’d be possible to put some sort of active camera surveillance all the way down this relatively short length with a big sign at the end with a message like “YA-01-AA – you have been driving dangerously. Fine $XXX, Lost YY points”.

When you’re with a group of cars who are happy to drive along together without any silliness, it’s actually a really pleasant trip.

I don’t think there’s a definite demographic for stupidity, just what you see on the day.

Snarky – did you see many motorcyclists on the way home? We saw quite a few, and most of them seemed very sensible.

Snarky 10:28 am 19 Mar 12

Seconding VY above. We also spent the weekend at the coast, and saw the Clyde in both the best and worst conditions (9pm in the rain on Friday, contrasting with fine and sunny Sunday afternoon). The road is fine. It’s well made and, on actually closely looking at it from the passenger seat for a change, it’s wider than I thought in many places and in pretty good repair. It has one major issue, and that’s the fact it traverses a very steep, if relatively short, mountain, and no amount of remedial work will change that fact.

Drivers for the most part were as VY described – go with the flow, drive to the conditions etc. Of the three really stupid incidents I saw all three were NSW plates, which genuinely surprised me. Two were tradies utes (well, perhaps not such a surprise) and a small red sports thing with a P plate (even less a surprise) driving like he’d lost the will to live on such a wet, dark and windy road.

I know there are accidents all along the highway, but it really is that 5km + 3km stretch down the Clyde that terrifies. I wonder if it’d be possible to put some sort of active camera surveillance all the way down this relatively short length with a big sign at the end with a message like “YA-01-AA – you have been driving dangerously. Fine $XXX, Lost YY points”.

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 9:40 am 19 Mar 12

Well, I just did an extended weekend to the far south coast and back, and noticed a few things:
1) There are lots of Canberra vehicles on both the Kings and Monaro highways.
2) Most vehicles tend to run along at 105-110km/h, and are happy to go with the flow, overtaking occasionally at an overtaking lane or an open stretch
3) I saw about half a dozen moves on the road that I would consider really stupid, all of which related to overtaking
4) Of the stupid moves, all but 1 vehicle were Canberra plated 4WD/SUVs
5) I saw several instances where slow vehicles pulled over to let traffic pass

What does this mean? Probably nothing. It was a trip there and back, with me keeping my eyes open.

This is not meant to be an inflammatory, just an observation.

c_c 12:47 pm 16 Mar 12

I think the stereotyping about small cars will change in coming years. No doubt a lot of them are slow, and more to the point their gearboxes and engines don’t offer much in the way of acceleration. But the market is moving very quickly towards hot hatches no that the American market wants it. So we’re getting more and more small cars that may not have huge engines, but have Direct injection, turbo diesel or both and s-loads more torque. Definitely should make econoboxes more enjoyable to drive but also a bit more hazardous when people don’t seem to understand basic concepts about vehicle dynamics these days. Torque-steer, under steer… none of which is in road ready either. So unless you get a decent instructor or do your own research…

EvanJames 11:28 am 16 Mar 12

DarkLadyWolfMother said :

Yup, it was the Charade. Perhaps that suggests we need to mandate the 500cc Suzuki as being the P plater car!

It certainly put a stop to my frequent P-plater crashes. Bloody thing, it was one step up from a sit-down lawn mower! But you could fit 5 passengers into it, if you crammed them in (no back seats helped). Car developed a flat tyre in protest at that stunt. I think the Mightyboys had the same engine, that would prevent car-stuffing shennanigans.

If they were really serious about P plater crashes, they’d have a rental system where P platers could only drive Mightyboys, and the family or P plater could rent them for the duration.

DarkLadyWolfMother 10:27 am 16 Mar 12

EvanJames said :

Not a 500cc Suzuki Hatch? I had one of those. Silliest thing you could do with those was stuff them full of too many people. I did that.

OTOH, the 3 cylinder 900cc Charade was sprightly enough to get into trouble, yes.

Yup, it was the Charade. Perhaps that suggests we need to mandate the 500cc Suzuki as being the P plater car!

devils_advocate 10:18 am 16 Mar 12

KB1971 said :

The thing is what do they drive. Any 1600 or 2 litre 4 cylinder will do close to the double tonne, gone are the days of low power 4 cylinder cars.

If you want to limit P platers then speed limiters are the answer to that one.

I don’t agree. P-platers/teenagers, especially males, will act impulsively and drive impatiently, due to brain development or showing off to their mates. The time it takes to perform an overtaking manouvre is almost purely a function of horsepower, which many modern econoboxes are severely lacking to the point of being unsafe.

devils_advocate 10:15 am 16 Mar 12

Malteser said :

It would be more reasonable to assume that today’s learner and P-plate drivers would be driving cars from the early nineties, which for the most part are front-wheel drive econoboxes.

And I actually find on the Kings Highway it is not learner or P plate drivers that are the main problem, it is generally middle aged women and cashed-up-bogans-type mid twenties males.

I’m not sure why you mentioned learner and P Platers??

Because you talked about people getting experience driving crappy cars on the coast roads. I pointed out this was a rite of passage for anyone that grew up in Canberra, and the time of life when people are driving crappy cars. The next post seems to be saying that it’s not actually this demographic that is the problem, it’s more self-entitled bogans.

devils_advocate 10:13 am 16 Mar 12

Malteser said :

devils_advocate said :

Malteser said :

I would say that I am considering nearly everyone travelling that road is in a car no less than the year 2000 make.

Then you’re living in fantasy world. When I was in high school, the vast majority of us had cars that were built well before we were born (with the exception of a couple of rich kids whose parents bought them a car). And yes this was a private school. These cars were typically rear wheel drive sedans with modest engine capacities (1.8-2.0 four cyl) and modest power outputs.

It would be more reasonable to assume that today’s learner and P-plate drivers would be driving cars from the early nineties, which for the most part are front-wheel drive econoboxes.

When you were in high school was probably the same year man landed on the moon. I’m talking about 2012.

Relative car affordability hasn’t changed that much. Teenagers for the most part still get s–tbox cars as their first cars. Even in 2012.

EvanJames 10:02 am 16 Mar 12

DarkLadyWolfMother said :

My first car was a 3-cylinder, less than one liter car. No fuel injection, no turbo. It didn’t stop me doing stupid things. Luck means I never wrapped myself around anything, but I gave it a few good tries. They’ll never match the acceleration/speed of the larger engines, but you can still make them do silly things.

Not a 500cc Suzuki Hatch? I had one of those. Silliest thing you could do with those was stuff them full of too many people. I did that.

OTOH, the 3 cylinder 900cc Charade was sprightly enough to get into trouble, yes.

EvanJames 10:00 am 16 Mar 12

Thumper said :

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

My first car was a Holden Torana, older than me, with the 173 cubic inch 6 and three on the tree.

Compared with modern cars it was very slow, and things (like loss of traction and sliding) happened at very low speeds.

Mine was a 1968 HK station wagon with a 253 V8 and three on the tree.

Went like a cut cat, handled like a boat and stopped like a jumbo jet.

Yet I managed to drive it down the coast many a time when the road was a shocker.

People simply need to slow down and be aware of their abilities as a driver. No stress, what’s 10-20 minutes?

Reminds me of my first driving forays down the Clyde in a XC Falcon Ute, auto (with the gears on the steering wheel), 4.1 litre 6 cylinder. The above describes its handling quite well! Very powerful, but the brake fade on the Clyde was downright scary, that was long before they smoothed out the curves and widened it too.

Nothing ever happened.

DarkLadyWolfMother 9:52 am 16 Mar 12

HenryBG said :

We could boost the Australian car industry by creating a new and unique “P-Plater” spec – a 3-cylinder go-go mobile to be the required car for the first 3 years of having a licence. People would moan, but people would be far, far safer.

My first car was a 3-cylinder, less than one liter car. No fuel injection, no turbo. It didn’t stop me doing stupid things. Luck means I never wrapped myself around anything, but I gave it a few good tries. They’ll never match the acceleration/speed of the larger engines, but you can still make them do silly things.

dtc 9:48 am 16 Mar 12

My first car was a Datsun Bluebird station wagon (auto). I always wonder whether I am a patient driver because of it – going up the Clyde I used to laugh at the signs telling me that the speed limit was 70km/h, because my car at high revs was barely pushing 35. There was no ability to show how fast I could drive, so I just never bothered, even when I later had cars that could do it easily.

Thumper 9:37 am 16 Mar 12

VYBerlinaV8_is_back said :

My first car was a Holden Torana, older than me, with the 173 cubic inch 6 and three on the tree.

Compared with modern cars it was very slow, and things (like loss of traction and sliding) happened at very low speeds.

Mine was a 1968 HK station wagon with a 253 V8 and three on the tree.

Went like a cut cat, handled like a boat and stopped like a jumbo jet.

Yet I managed to drive it down the coast many a time when the road was a shocker.

People simply need to slow down and be aware of their abilities as a driver. No stress, what’s 10-20 minutes?

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