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Police seek Parkwood Witnesses

By johnboy 13 March 2012 30

ACT Policing is calling for witnesses to an aggravated burglary at the Parkwood Egg Farm in Macgregor overnight, which has resulted in significant damage to the farm’s production equipment.

Police believe the offender(s) gained entry to the property late last night sometime between 11pm (Monday, March 12) and 6am today (Tuesday, March 13).

The criminal damage included smashed glass in the office area, cut conveyor belts, water damage to egg packaging, and smashed control equipment. Production at the facility is likely to be significantly affected as a result of the damage.

Police are also investing a link between this burglary, and the posting of an internet message and video, claiming responsibility for the offence.

Anyone who may have seen or heard any suspicious activity in the area of the facility late last night or early this morning is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000, or via www.act.crimestoppers.com.au. Information can be provided anonymously.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

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Police seek Parkwood Witnesses
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p1 4:22 pm 14 Mar 12

SnapperJack said :

Holden Caulfield said :

EvanJames said :

It’s pathetic and depressing when the Americans are beating us at English.

While we still have aluminium we should be okay.

… and Autumn instead of “fall”, and buoys instead of “boo-wees” 🙂

I usually confuse them by asking how they pronounce buoyant.

SnapperJack 3:39 pm 14 Mar 12

Holden Caulfield said :

EvanJames said :

It’s pathetic and depressing when the Americans are beating us at English.

While we still have aluminium we should be okay.

… and Autumn instead of “fall”, and buoys instead of “boo-wees” 🙂

Holden Caulfield 2:29 pm 14 Mar 12

EvanJames said :

It’s pathetic and depressing when the Americans are beating us at English.

While we still have aluminium we should be okay.

Mysteryman 2:20 pm 14 Mar 12

EvanJames said :

I’m noticing with some sadness that US publications are less prone to grammatical and punctuation howlers than Australian publications.

Locally, every second possessive its now sports the dreaded apostrophe. Americans seem to do this a lot less.

I see nasties like “comprised of” here, in government and other official documents, and in the media. And I keep seeing “comprised” used correctly in US publications.

It’s pathetic and depressing when the Americans are beating us at English.

Yes, because it’s clearly a competition.

p1 2:09 pm 14 Mar 12

EvanJames said :

I’m noticing with some sadness that US publications are less prone to grammatical and punctuation howlers than Australian publications.

Locally, every second possessive its now sports the dreaded apostrophe. Americans seem to do this a lot less.

I see nasties like “comprised of” here, in government and other official documents, and in the media. And I keep seeing “comprised” used correctly in US publications.

It’s pathetic and depressing when the Americans are beating us at English.

While I agree that it is sad that the USA-ians might be beating us at anything, let alone this, I suggest it might be the result of different philosophies in the way children are taught and assessed in school. In North America they have a much larger focus on rote learning, being able to recite all the States, or all the planet names, etc but less of a focus on understanding concepts.

At least that was my experience 15 years ago. I kinda hoping that is one area where we are not copying the yanks.

EvanJames 1:29 pm 14 Mar 12

I’m noticing with some sadness that US publications are less prone to grammatical and punctuation howlers than Australian publications.

Locally, every second possessive its now sports the dreaded apostrophe. Americans seem to do this a lot less.

I see nasties like “comprised of” here, in government and other official documents, and in the media. And I keep seeing “comprised” used correctly in US publications.

It’s pathetic and depressing when the Americans are beating us at English.

Jivrashia said :

Jim Jones said :

Finally: English is a living, evolving language. It’s not a ‘test’. It’s used for many things, and what is considered ‘correct’ alters over time according to usage. The ‘younger generation’ will determine what is acceptable English, not people claiming that a mediocre media release is indicative of the failing of society as a whole.

You’re more than welcome to repeat that statement when some young bloke in-corrects you on your grammar or spelling. And when it happens I hope you are gracious enough not to spit the dummy like I did.

In-corrects.

poetix 12:50 pm 14 Mar 12

Jim Jones said :

Jivrashia said :

Tooks said :

A civilian writing crappy media releases is somehow indicative of the entire organisation? What a load of bollocks.

The younger workforce writing crappy written English, whether that be through a forum such as this, their own personal email, or even a media release, IS indicative of the failing of the entire society in general.

The bollocks is with the older generation who will not or cannot educate the younger generation in proper written English.

Firstly: the purpose of the media release is to lay out information in an easily understood way. While the written style isn’t reminiscent of the wondrous prose of Dickens, it hasn’t failed at doing its job in any way that I can see.

Secondly: you’re assuming that the person who wrote this is ‘young’. I don’t think anyone has provided evidence for this. It’s an assumption that says a lot about the assumer, and little else.

Finally: English is a living, evolving language. It’s not a ‘test’. It’s used for many things, and what is considered ‘correct’ alters over time according to usage. The ‘younger generation’ will determine what is acceptable English, not people claiming that a mediocre media release is indicative of the failing of society as a whole.

As someone else has noted, *you* write English with authority, so people are more likely to take what you say seriously. Of course English evolves, but that is different from making basic mistakes in punctuation and grammar that detract from what you are trying to communicate (let alone playing with the language because you know it so well). Crude errors put a red question mark next to a person’s ideas.

I think, unfortunately, that the gap between those who know the basic rules of English and those who don’t is growing. If you write English really badly, this will affect career options. More importantly, if you can’t understand written language at more than a basic level, you are cut off from reading books for anything but gleaning a few facts, and you might as well be dead. (That last little bit was a joke. Sort of.)

Jivrashia 12:13 pm 14 Mar 12

Jim Jones said :

Finally: English is a living, evolving language. It’s not a ‘test’. It’s used for many things, and what is considered ‘correct’ alters over time according to usage. The ‘younger generation’ will determine what is acceptable English, not people claiming that a mediocre media release is indicative of the failing of society as a whole.

You’re more than welcome to repeat that statement when some young bloke in-corrects you on your grammar or spelling. And when it happens I hope you are gracious enough not to spit the dummy like I did.

Tooks 10:56 am 14 Mar 12

Jim Jones said :

Jivrashia said :

Tooks said :

A civilian writing crappy media releases is somehow indicative of the entire organisation? What a load of bollocks.

The younger workforce writing crappy written English, whether that be through a forum such as this, their own personal email, or even a media release, IS indicative of the failing of the entire society in general.

The bollocks is with the older generation who will not or cannot educate the younger generation in proper written English.

Firstly: the purpose of the media release is to lay out information in an easily understood way. While the written style isn’t reminiscent of the wondrous prose of Dickens, it hasn’t failed at doing its job in any way that I can see.

Secondly: you’re assuming that the person who wrote this is ‘young’. I don’t think anyone has provided evidence for this. It’s an assumption that says a lot about the assumer, and little else.

Finally: English is a living, evolving language. It’s not a ‘test’. It’s used for many things, and what is considered ‘correct’ alters over time according to usage. The ‘younger generation’ will determine what is acceptable English, not people claiming that a mediocre media release is indicative of the failing of society as a whole.

Well said (and written).

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