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7.30 ACT – what to expect from tonight’s program

By Canfan 3 October 2014 29

harden-abc-031014

7.30 ACT on the ABC
Friday October 3rd

  1. Multi Cultural voice of Canberra – expressing disquiet and even fear about the tone of the current Team Australia conversation. Some Muslim women too scared to go out – others giving up the Hijab for fear of attack.
  2. Log Jam – ecologists acting like beavers to save the Murrumbidgee.
  3. Garage Baker – fine pastry cook and cake maker operating out of his suburban Dickson garage.
  4. Haptic art – an exhibition at Tuggeranong Arts Centre.

Photo is by Damian Porombka (Canola fields near Harden).

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29 Responses to
7.30 ACT – what to expect from tonight’s program
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Southmouth 9:26 pm 07 Oct 14

dungfungus said :

Southmouth said :

Regarding 1. Isn’t this like letting a fear of trolls stopping me from crossing bridges? Since 9/11, how many Muslims have been killed in hate crimes by Australians? Compare this number to how many Australians have been killed by Muslim Terrorists. Reality check!

How about you give us the numbers regarding who has killed whom then.

To start with, 92 Australians killed in 2 Bali bombings, couldn’t find any Muslim hate crime murders.

dungfungus 6:49 pm 07 Oct 14

F_Frank said :

” You have raised a good point concerning the misuse of registered names, particularly buy governments.
The IP Australia ATMOSS database reveals that there several registrations of the name “Team Australia”. The Australian Olympic Committee has all except one. The lone one is the one you have referred to (owned by DMO) and it has also a registered trademark.
While I am not an expert in these matters it would appear that if DMO wanted to they could tell Tony Abbott to find another name or arrange a license to use the name, for a fee.”

It would be hard to argue misuse when the campaign has been used, by the PM, to launch a foreign war and increase security spending. Must just be coincidence.

A patent lawyer may think differently but I am sure by now DMO have given consent for the PM to use the phrase.

F_Frank 1:36 pm 07 Oct 14

” You have raised a good point concerning the misuse of registered names, particularly buy governments.
The IP Australia ATMOSS database reveals that there several registrations of the name “Team Australia”. The Australian Olympic Committee has all except one. The lone one is the one you have referred to (owned by DMO) and it has also a registered trademark.
While I am not an expert in these matters it would appear that if DMO wanted to they could tell Tony Abbott to find another name or arrange a license to use the name, for a fee.”

It would be hard to argue misuse when the campaign has been used, by the PM, to launch a foreign war and increase security spending. Must just be coincidence.

dungfungus 8:15 am 07 Oct 14

Southmouth said :

Regarding 1. Isn’t this like letting a fear of trolls stopping me from crossing bridges? Since 9/11, how many Muslims have been killed in hate crimes by Australians? Compare this number to how many Australians have been killed by Muslim Terrorists. Reality check!

How about you give us the numbers regarding who has killed whom then.

dungfungus 9:08 pm 06 Oct 14

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd said :

dungfungus said :

bigfeet said :

Masquara said :

Why did your wife feel impelled to cover her head in the first place though? the fact that this oppression appeared to be “loosely applied” doesn’t make it OK for Australian women to be pressured to cover their heads. Anywhere.

I guess she did it for the same reason that people many wear motorcycle helmets when riding motorcycles in Australia. I’m sure, if given the option many people would prefer not to. But they don’t have that choice. It is the law.

Same with smoking at bus stops in Canberra, or walking around with guns on their belts, or being forced to provide ID when getting a mobile phone, or the prohibition on owning a pet cheetah, or walking around naked, or parking where you like for free, or using fireworks, or taking cannabis for pain relief, or being compelled to vote, or being forced to take part in a census, or refusing to allow gays to marry.

Many people in many parts of the world would consider many of those laws oppressive.

By the way. I didn’t feel oppressed in Iran because it was illegal for me to walk down the street without a shirt on. Something I take for granted as a right in Australia (that I never exercise except perhaps at a beach).

Australians should obey the law wherever they are. There are ways and means to effect change of laws both here and overseas. Arbitrarily breaking those laws is not one of those methods.

“Australians should obey the law wherever they are….”
It’s past time the meaning of “Australian” was clarified.
We now have a group of people who have their own (unelected) Australian leader and “the law” to them is not what is to most Australians who were born here.
This is not acceptable to me.

Source?

Just when we thought it was safe to go in the water, he’s back!
Get a life dude.

dungfungus 9:06 pm 06 Oct 14

watto23 said :

dungfungus said :

I missed last night’s 7.30 and it is not yet available to watch on the computer.
I have heard reports on ABC 666 Radio this morning that a Muslim woman had been interviewed and she said she had stopped wearing her hijab in Canberra because of fears of attack etc.
Has she reported these abuses and threats to the authorities?
I am unaware where this lady comes from but if she was to return to her country of origin she would be immediately told to put her hijab back on, as would any other Western woman visiting most Muslim countries.
The point I am making is that in Australia, the woman has a choice whereas in most Muslim countries she doesn’t have any rights let alone a choice.
BTW, I have stopped flying overseas because I fear a terrorist attack. Is 7.30 ABC going to have a report about my fears?

Again please use facts before making unfounded points about what other countries would do. The only country I’m aware of that makes a western woman wear a head scarf (yes just a head scarf) is Iran. None of the Eastern Asian countries do, Saudi Arabia might, but getting a tourist visa there is difficult for a non muslim. Jordan, Syria and Lebanon don’t. Afghanistan and Iraq are war zones, but journalists certainly don’t seem to be wearing a scarf. The old russian stans don’t, Pakistan doesn’t, UAE, Oman, Egypt don’t. Not sure about Yemen, but again its a pretty unstable place. West African countries are also unlikely.

What many countries do do is make you dress conservatively especially in and around religious sites. This applies to buddhist countries as much as muslim countries.

The problem with fear is its often based on ignorance and hatred. I’m not saying everyone who has fear toweards muslims hates them, but the people making outlandish statements like Jacqui Lambie, probably do. Ever stop to think the fear and anti muslim propoganda, is actually making the chances of a terrorist attack more likely. Its the whole equal and opposite forces. The more you victimise people the more they fight back.

even the guy being attacked in the military uniform was not true, and my many friends in the military said they ususally don’t wear their uniform on the way home, etc because there are far more anti-war hippies who would spit on them than muslims.

Is it just me or am I the only one that doesn’t want to die by beheading.

Comic_and_Gamer_Nerd 7:01 pm 06 Oct 14

dungfungus said :

bigfeet said :

Masquara said :

Why did your wife feel impelled to cover her head in the first place though? the fact that this oppression appeared to be “loosely applied” doesn’t make it OK for Australian women to be pressured to cover their heads. Anywhere.

I guess she did it for the same reason that people many wear motorcycle helmets when riding motorcycles in Australia. I’m sure, if given the option many people would prefer not to. But they don’t have that choice. It is the law.

Same with smoking at bus stops in Canberra, or walking around with guns on their belts, or being forced to provide ID when getting a mobile phone, or the prohibition on owning a pet cheetah, or walking around naked, or parking where you like for free, or using fireworks, or taking cannabis for pain relief, or being compelled to vote, or being forced to take part in a census, or refusing to allow gays to marry.

Many people in many parts of the world would consider many of those laws oppressive.

By the way. I didn’t feel oppressed in Iran because it was illegal for me to walk down the street without a shirt on. Something I take for granted as a right in Australia (that I never exercise except perhaps at a beach).

Australians should obey the law wherever they are. There are ways and means to effect change of laws both here and overseas. Arbitrarily breaking those laws is not one of those methods.

“Australians should obey the law wherever they are….”
It’s past time the meaning of “Australian” was clarified.
We now have a group of people who have their own (unelected) Australian leader and “the law” to them is not what is to most Australians who were born here.
This is not acceptable to me.

Source?

dungfungus 5:45 pm 06 Oct 14

bigfeet said :

Masquara said :

Why did your wife feel impelled to cover her head in the first place though? the fact that this oppression appeared to be “loosely applied” doesn’t make it OK for Australian women to be pressured to cover their heads. Anywhere.

I guess she did it for the same reason that people many wear motorcycle helmets when riding motorcycles in Australia. I’m sure, if given the option many people would prefer not to. But they don’t have that choice. It is the law.

Same with smoking at bus stops in Canberra, or walking around with guns on their belts, or being forced to provide ID when getting a mobile phone, or the prohibition on owning a pet cheetah, or walking around naked, or parking where you like for free, or using fireworks, or taking cannabis for pain relief, or being compelled to vote, or being forced to take part in a census, or refusing to allow gays to marry.

Many people in many parts of the world would consider many of those laws oppressive.

By the way. I didn’t feel oppressed in Iran because it was illegal for me to walk down the street without a shirt on. Something I take for granted as a right in Australia (that I never exercise except perhaps at a beach).

Australians should obey the law wherever they are. There are ways and means to effect change of laws both here and overseas. Arbitrarily breaking those laws is not one of those methods.

“Australians should obey the law wherever they are….”
It’s past time the meaning of “Australian” was clarified.
We now have a group of people who have their own (unelected) Australian leader and “the law” to them is not what is to most Australians who were born here.
This is not acceptable to me.

Masquara 4:16 pm 06 Oct 14

bigfeet said :

Masquara said :

Why did your wife feel impelled to cover her head in the first place though? the fact that this oppression appeared to be “loosely applied” doesn’t make it OK for Australian women to be pressured to cover their heads. Anywhere.

I guess she did it for the same reason that people many wear motorcycle helmets when riding motorcycles in Australia. I’m sure, if given the option many people would prefer not to. But they don’t have that choice. It is the law.

Same with smoking at bus stops in Canberra, or walking around with guns on their belts, or being forced to provide ID when getting a mobile phone, or the prohibition on owning a pet cheetah, or walking around naked, or parking where you like for free, or using fireworks, or taking cannabis for pain relief, or being compelled to vote, or being forced to take part in a census, or refusing to allow gays to marry.

Many people in many parts of the world would consider many of those laws oppressive.

By the way. I didn’t feel oppressed in Iran because it was illegal for me to walk down the street without a shirt on. Something I take for granted as a right in Australia (that I never exercise except perhaps at a beach).

Australians should obey the law wherever they are. There are ways and means to effect change of laws both here and overseas. Arbitrarily breaking those laws is not one of those methods.

All the examples you cite there are not gender specific.

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