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Guide Dogs’ marketing strategy … what do you think?

By I-filed - 6 December 2008 9

I just took a selling call from the Guide Dogs – naturally want to support them, so though RSPCA is my first animal welfare option to help out financially, I thought ‘OK, I’ll spend 5 or 10 dollars’. The caller said they had calendars for $12.95, so I thought, OK, bit more than I was going to spend … but OK for Chrissy for Gran maybe. So I said I would buy a calendar. “Oh, no,” said the operator. “You can’t just buy one. I’ll have to sell you two. The accountants have told us we have to sell $25 worth or it isn’t worth our while. We lose money on the transaction.”

“Sorry,” I said – thinking I was calling her bluff – “I’m only up for buying a calendar for $12.95. There’s a recession on! And I only have one Granny who would like a puppy calendar.”

Believe it or not, the Guide Dogs then declined to take my money and sell me a calendar! The caller, sounding a bit short, instructed me to go to the web and buy a calendar online!

Apart from Rioters who delight in letting the rest of us know that they spend no holds barred on EL2+ salaries – what do you think? Was that a strange way to go about fundraising? Are they shooting themselves in the foot? Or am I behind the times?

What’s Your opinion?


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9 Responses to
Guide Dogs’ marketing strategy … what do you think?
1
poptop 5:09 pm
06 Dec 08
#

Big error by the Guide Dog people. Seriously, how many things with labradors on them can one person [grandmother or otherwise] tolerate?

2
Jonathon Reynolds 5:54 pm
06 Dec 08
#

I stopped giving “money” to charities a long time ago. When I “give” to the particular charities that I choose to support, I offer my personal time and expertise (so long as it in itself is not directly for the purposes of raising money from others). This way I know that the whatever effort I personally give to the cause will go directly to benefiting the intended end recipients.

Unfortunately many of the charities just want money.

3
ant 6:21 pm
06 Dec 08
#

buying stuff from charities leads your address and phone number to become the property of every telemarketer and spammer in the universe, it seems. It’s such a shame, and makes people very cynical about the charity machine.

4
miz 7:28 pm
06 Dec 08
#

I hear you, Ant. I did some door knocking for the Heart Foundation a few years ago and was subsequently beseiged by telemarketers for at least a couple of years. Charities are exempt from the do not call register. I decline all phone sales now – on a ‘house rules’ basis.

And because those awful calls from India come up ‘unavailable’ on my phone number display, I can just not pick up.

Actually I am also a bit annoyed that red cross (whom I admire) are hawking at the hyperdome at present. Not for donations though, which I would be happy to provide, but for sign ups for regular direct debit. If they knew how much CPS credit union are hitting me for monthly service fees, they would not ask for direct debits!

I prefer charities to door knock or advertise through the media.

5
Peachy 9:18 pm
06 Dec 08
#

I’m friends with a blind lady that does a lot of work with the various blind societies and she recommended donating dog food, old towels, blankets and things like ice cream containers for food and water bowls to the guide dog kennels (wherever they train them) over monetary donations.

6
bigfeet 9:37 pm
06 Dec 08
#

miz said :

Actually I am also a bit annoyed that red cross (whom I admire) are hawking at the hyperdome at present. Not for donations though, which I would be happy to provide, but for sign ups for regular direct debit.

This one is a particular bugbear of mine. They are just so insistent and in-your-face pushy, wanting credit card details on the spot.

Peachy said :

I’m friends with a blind lady that does a lot of work with the various blind societies and she recommended donating dog food, old towels, blankets and things like ice cream containers for food and water bowls to the guide dog kennels (wherever they train them) over monetary donations.

Peachy, where can we drop these sort of things off? I quite often drop a bag of dry dog food off to the RSPCA, and would happily do the same to Guide Dogs if I knew where.

7
farnarkler 5:44 am
07 Dec 08
#

It isn’t nice being ‘chugged’ or charity mugged as they call it in the UK.

Bigfeet has the right idea in buying a few bags of food or some toys (my father sends all manner of treats and toys to the RSPCA for their cats). The chuggers are doing the charities more harm than good in their aggresive requests, almost demands, for money.

8
Whatsup 7:25 am
07 Dec 08
#

Many of the supermarkets have a collection box for groceries that will go to families who will be missing out this Christmas. If you can afford to slip a couple of extra items in your trolley then you can leave them in the box with a guarantee of no annoying follow up or being placed on an email list.

9
Primal 10:12 am
07 Dec 08
#

http://www.guidedogs.com.au/shop/DefaultShop.aspx?PageID=10

And it’s cheaper online too – she gave you good advice!

(I’ve bought stuff from them online before…no hassle, no complaints.)

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