Skip to content Skip to main navigation

News

Recruiting experts in
Accountancy & Finance

Lost bushwalker found

By johnboy - 18 October 2011 13

A 60-year-old man has been reunited with his family after becoming lost in bushland in Namadgi National Park late last night (Monday, 17 October).

The man who was visiting the area became separated from his wife, who after a search of the surrounding area was unable to locate her husband, and notified police around 9.30pm.

Police attended the last known location of the man and commenced an extensive bushland search for the man.

The man was located by police around 11.30pm, approximately four kilometres from where he was last sighted.

South District Superintendent Lesa Gale said that with the warmer months quickly approaching, more people are likely to enjoy the walking trails around Canberra’s national parks.

“ACT Policing would like to remind people to take the proper precautions before they go bushwalking. Make sure that you are properly clothed and equipped, have some sort of communication or GPS device and let people know your route and estimated departure and arrival times,” Superintendent Gale said.

[Courtesy ACT Policing]

What’s Your opinion?


Post a comment
Please login to post your comments, or connect with
13 Responses to
Lost bushwalker found
STOLEN CAR 12:35 am 19 Oct 11

p1 said :

ThatUniStudent said :

…between Nursery swamp and Ron Day View creek and…

Love the spelling of rendezvous.

🙂

…Ron Day …mate of Paddy Pallin’s

p1 10:58 pm 18 Oct 11

ThatUniStudent said :

…between Nursery swamp and Ron Day View creek and…

Love the spelling of rendezvous. 🙂

ThatUniStudent said :

The smart bloke decided it would be fun to hide their camp and camo up the tent then half an hour later could not find it and ended up walking out that night. When we went back the following summer the tent was no longer there not surprisingly.

That is hilarious!

ThatUniStudent 9:06 pm 18 Oct 11

Maps are wonderful things. But so is a sense of direction. I have explored in Namadgi for over 10 years now without carrying a map, compass or GPS. But I am one of the lucky few who has an unfailing sense of direction, and am just good at remembering where I have been. It is gresat to wander along the barely discernable track between Nursery swamp and Ron Day View creek and tell my mates, it’s okay, we’re not lost, in about 50 metres there will be a fallen log / pile of rocks etc and sure enough there is. There are some unoffical tracks that are barely marked where people get lost on. The one between Nursery and RDV creeks is a bad one. When people get to Hadley’s Hope they just tend to get lost. There has been three searches down that valley that I know of. About 4 years ago a mate of mine and his missus went camping out there overnight and got lost. The smart bloke decided it would be fun to hide their camp and camo up the tent then half an hour later could not find it and ended up walking out that night. When we went back the following summer the tent was no longer there not surprisingly.

peterepete 6:49 pm 18 Oct 11

Thumper said :

One word.

Map.

Learn how they work.

Well its not that easy – I cant work out the correct gestures to zoom in properly on a small screen…..Actually I bet the bloke’s wife may have taught him a lesson or two afterwards about map carrying and reading.

Thumper 6:36 pm 18 Oct 11

One word.

Map.

Learn how they work.

jawm 6:15 pm 18 Oct 11

>>This is turning in to a geek-bash-fiesta, isn’t it? Why no support for GPS…
Nothing wrong with GPS, just don’t rely on it as a primary means of navigation. I’ve had many experiences over the years (hiking, driving and flying aeroplanes) where my location as reported by the GPS (some of them very expensive units) was just plain *wrong*, not inaccurate, totally wrong. Coronal Mass Ejections, sun spots, jamming, atmospherics, hardware/software errors – you name it, plenty of scope for GPS to mess up. If you’re out in the middle of nowhere nothing beats a good topo map/compass/nav skills and a healthy amount of situational awareness. Oh and a detailed plan of where you’re going and when you’ll be back (left with someone responsible). That said, I do take a good topo (1:25000) GPS along for extra support, plus a SPOT and a PLB device. Use technology wherever you can to make life that bit easier, just don’t expect it to save your bacon as it does fail (often!).

Jivrashia 5:11 pm 18 Oct 11

jawm said :

the map and compass (and nav skills) are the best option.

p1 said :

I was doing three day hikes in Namadgi and Kosi NPs with a paper map and compass.

You said :

Why not just take common sense, a compass, a map and stick to used trails?

This is turning in to a geek-bash-fiesta, isn’t it? Why no support for GPS…

Okay, okay. Law is probably over the top. Education perhaps, and possibly a free hand out of photocopied topography maps with key landmarks highlighted.

troll-sniffer said :

Did the first people taking tentative steps into Australia stop dead

… If my history lesson of early explorer into the Australian outback serves me well, the answer to that is sort of yes (Stop dead, no, they were brave men. Dead, yes, they underestimated the barrenness of the land).

shirty_bear 4:14 pm 18 Oct 11

troll-sniffer said :

So one person got disoriented on the weekend. Whoopee do. Occasionally it will happen. For every person who gets lost, several thousand accomplish basic navigation in perfect safety.

Good call, and I agree that mandating GPS/etc is an OTT kneejerk suggestion. But …

troll-sniffer said :

How the bejoisus did Australia ever get opened up? Did the first people taking tentative steps into Australia stop dead, no GPS to guide them?

… is a silly comparison. When Aus was being opened up, it was common for people to die in the process.

You 3:23 pm 18 Oct 11

Why not just take common sense, a compass, a map and stick to used trails?

It’s worked fine for me.

troll-sniffer 3:01 pm 18 Oct 11

What is it with this insistence that people carry effing electronics wherever they go? How the bejoisus did Australia ever get opened up? Did the first people taking tentative steps into Australia stop dead, no GPS to guide them? Did even one generation back need to rely on a glorified computer game to know where they were?

So one person got disoriented on the weekend. Whoopee do. Occasionally it will happen. For every person who gets lost, several thousand accomplish basic navigation in perfect safety. If there was a rush of lost people, then perhaps there would be a case for mandating devices but IMHO an occasional errant soul doth not an epidemic make.

p1 2:13 pm 18 Oct 11

Jivrashia said :

We really should turn this into law…..

We really should not!

Sure, I am all for society being grumpy at people who go get themselves in trouble by doing things without the appropriate s kills or equipment, but when I was 14 I was doing three day hikes in Namadgi and Kosi NPs with a paper map and compass. Hand held GPS units were only just available then, but well outside the price range of anyone but the military.

Rules regarding EPIRBS in remote country are a pretty good idea, but mandating the carrying of GPS is a classic example of nanny state mentality.

jawm 2:12 pm 18 Oct 11

Sure, let’s wrap laws around everything, that’ll make us all nice and safe. Maybe I should also wear a bike helmet when I go bushwalking as well? Let’s also rely on satellite technology, and our smart phones… they’ll never break… hmmm… can I suggest if you’re going bush (and want to go by yourself – which is fine if you’re prepared and capable) – then don’t rely on anything that needs a battery or uses radio waves… a good topo map, a compass and competent navigational skills are the best things to have… sure, take a GPS, take a SPOT, take a PLB, heck, take a Satphone – just don’t rely on any of them – the map and compass (and nav skills) are the best option.

Jivrashia 1:48 pm 18 Oct 11

If you are going in to snow country you must either have a AWD or a snow chain for the tyres.

If you are going in to bush country you must have a GPS at the minimum, preferably with track back feature (aka “bread crumb”). This shouldn’t be too hard as a lot of smart phones come with GPS capability these days.

We really should turn this into law. Too many people, even pollies (not that we’d miss them), are getting lost these days and needing to be rescued, when a simple glance at a GPS could have prevented it.

Related Articles

CBR Tweets

Sign up to our newsletter

Top
Copyright © 2017 Riot ACT Holdings Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.
www.the-riotact.com | www.b2bmagazine.com.au | www.thisiscanberra.com

Search across the site