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Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? Drugs in the AMC.

By johnboy 2 April 2011 28

The Canberra Times has the not particularly surprising news that a secret report into the Alexander Maconochie Centre (aka “the prison”) lists prison staff as the main conduit of drugs to prisoners:

Four ”key informants” are quoted on the subject of guards trafficking drugs into the jail.

”Because we have so many staff coming and going every day in this correctional centre, one of the biggest challenges is to guard against trafficking (by staff),” one of the informants, believed to a staff member, told investigators.

”I believe we have some of that.”

Another witness was more blunt.

”There are guards bringing in drugs,” they told the institute’s researchers.

Considering bent guards are the major source of drugs in every other prison in the world this should not shock anyone.

Once one factors in the chronic ongoing incompetence of ACT Corrections it would frankly be shocking if this was not the case.

So next time you hear about drug busts at the prison bear in mind it’s as likely corrupt guards cutting down the competition as it is people doing their jobs well.

What’s Your opinion?


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28 Responses to
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? Drugs in the AMC.
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James_Ryan 7:16 pm 07 Apr 11

Mental Health Worker said :

NDRI and NDARC would have been far better choices.

Hey MHW. Wasn’t the Head of NDARC one of the independent expert advisors on the evaluation oversight group? Given that person’s endorsement of the Burnet Report it appears that one of you is wrong about the quality of the report. I reckon it’s you.

James_Ryan 6:45 pm 06 Apr 11

Mental Health Worker said :

James_Ryan – someone else speculates that the Burnet Institute asked loaded questions. It seems you have taken a leaf out of the book of loaded questions. I cannot answer any of your questions because they are so loaded.

You do seem to implicitly acknowledge shortcomings in the report, and you assume that is anyone’s fault except the Burnet Institute. That’s very generous of you. So generous as to be suspicious. Ultimately it doesn’t matter – their name is on the report, so it’s their reputation on the line.

I can only conclude that you have read a different report from the one I read, or you have no experience in critically reviewing social or health research papers.

THE END.

MHW

Just because you find the answers inconvenient doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with the questions. That you refuse to answer them reflects on you MHW, not the questions.

There was another I wanted to put to you.

You suggested NDARC would have been a better evaluator. You must hold that organisation and its leadership in high esteem. Fair enough too. No argument with that. I know you didn’t want to post your cv here, but would you agree that the learned woman I refer to would be better qualified than you to review the Burnet Report?

Mental Health Worker 4:09 am 06 Apr 11

James_Ryan – someone else speculates that the Burnet Institute asked loaded questions. It seems you have taken a leaf out of the book of loaded questions. I cannot answer any of your questions because they are so loaded.

You do seem to implicitly acknowledge shortcomings in the report, and you assume that is anyone’s fault except the Burnet Institute. That’s very generous of you. So generous as to be suspicious. Ultimately it doesn’t matter – their name is on the report, so it’s their reputation on the line.

I can only conclude that you have read a different report from the one I read, or you have no experience in critically reviewing social or health research papers.

THE END.

MHW

Skidbladnir 11:09 am 05 Apr 11

Sure, the logististics of getting something undiscovered to your intended target in the prison system aren’t kind, but given enough analysis, determination and proedural refinement, some kind of system could eventually be derived.
Ideally you’d facilitate an open communication channel first though.

(But the simplest explanation will almost likely be ‘they abused our weaknessesand took as little risk as possible until discovery’ )

johnboy 10:27 am 05 Apr 11

Yeah the inmates are desperate, but those supposedly throwing the drugs aren’t in fact they’re giving drugs away.

And they can’t be found with a properly defined perimeter, some cameras, and a very cheap motion sensor?

Skidbladnir 10:26 am 05 Apr 11

johnboy said :

I mean really, who pings valuable drugs onto the ground where *anyone* could find them?

The same kind of people with nothing to lose and are deperate enough for a drink they’ll drink something that tastes like bile?
(A bottle of juice, some sugar, and some vegemite is also an option)

However the stuff realy does smell vile, if you’re not incarcerated I see no reason to bother drinking it)

johnboy 9:58 am 05 Apr 11

My personal thinking is the tennis ball story is a myth put about by corrupt guards to take the heat off themselves.

I mean really, who pings valuable drugs onto the ground where *anyone* could find them?

Skidbladnir 9:49 am 05 Apr 11

georgesgenitals said :

Is it just me, or are people making the assumption that the only way drugs get into prisons is being carried through security checkpoints by humans?

Slingshots, drugs in a tennis ball, flyover by remote drone with payload, etc.

Actually, considering there’s an RC model club less than 1km away, you’d hope there were procedures in place for occasional flyovers of the latter

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