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RSPCA at CAT-pacity, adoption discounted till Wednesday

By Canfan 20 May 2016 34

cats

The cattery at RSPCA ACT’s Weston shelter is at CAT-pacity! The organisation is looking to find new homes for 150 cats and kittens currently in care.

At the cattery in Weston there are 17 living enclosures for cats and kittens available for adoption. RSPCA ACT has increased this to 28 living enclosures and has no more room.

Over the past few months RSPCA ACT has seen an increase in the amount of cats and kittens coming into the shelter. Currently there are close to 50 cats and kittens available for adoption. There are also another 30 cats and kittens waiting to be desexed so they can be placed up for adoption. RSPCA ACT also has over 80 cats and kittens still in foster.

RSPCA ACT Director Jane Gregor encourages people to visit the shelter and adopt, “Our shelter is completely full of wonderful cats and kittens looking for their new loving family. If you have been thinking about adopting, right now is the perfect time as we have so many felines that will suit varying lifestyles.”

The organisation will continue to put additional cats and kittens up for adoption once there is room available in the cattery.

Adoption fee is as follows:

Cat (over 6 months)
Standard Adoption Fee: $195
CAT-pacity Adoption Fee: $99

Kittens
Standard Adoption Fee: $295
CAT-pacity Adoption Fee: $149

The reduction in adoption fee is available until next Wednesday, May 25.

What’s Your opinion?


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RSPCA at CAT-pacity, adoption discounted till Wednesday
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Shart 4:39 pm 07 Jun 16

MERC600 said :

MERC600 said :

Why are the kittens more expensive than the cats? Just wondering.

I’d actually been thinking about adopting a kitten recently anyway, so I think I can help the RSPCA free up 1 spot at least. 🙂

Look at the cats too – I’ve adopted two older cats – no need to house train them, and mine have been wonderful. If you adopt an adult, their personality has developed which makes choosing one less risky re temperament traits. Plus it’s nice knowing you may have saved them from euthanasia (regardless of what the rescue places tell you, I doubt whether there really is a “no animals are ever euthanised” one).

I totally agree , I recently adopted an older cat and she is just amazing 🙂

Mordd 9:55 pm 28 May 16

gooterz said :

Lurker2913 said :

crackerpants said :

buttermaker said :

Considered in adopting a kitten but unfortunately, the reduction in adoption fees finished on 25th May. I received this RiotACT email on 26th May! Mordd, I am thinking the same question re kitten more expensive then cat.

I might visit RSPCA.

RSPCA have the discounted adoption fees semi-frequently so I’m sure the next one isn’t too far away.

Alternatively, if you decided to adopt an adult cat or an adolescent kitten (8-9 months old) I am pretty sure Flossie’s Kitten Rescue do a pretty reasonable adoption price for them – don’t quote me but I think it’s around $150 and includes desexing, microchipping, vaccinations, the whole shebang.

I’ll be looking into this further, part of what made me change my mind last minute was your prior comment about these services being willing to take the adoptee back if it really could not work out with the existing pet for some reason. I know my cat has a solo personality (ok a lot of cats do but yeh) and I did worrt about the stress I would be putting on her. So the idea of working with an agency before and after to help with the process is definitely appealing. And worth it I guess even if it does cost a bit more. I would still look to adopt ideally an adolescent male cat around 1yr of age.

If you see this reply today – Flossie’s Kitten Rescue are down at Belco Pets for an adoption day and they have some adolescent kitty cats with them… my personal favourite is Jamal – a gorgeous black boy kitty.

🙁 Was at work all day, doesn’t matter, i might give them a call this week for an initial chat.

Alexandra Craig 12:19 pm 28 May 16

Lurker2913 said :

crackerpants said :

buttermaker said :

Considered in adopting a kitten but unfortunately, the reduction in adoption fees finished on 25th May. I received this RiotACT email on 26th May! Mordd, I am thinking the same question re kitten more expensive then cat.

I might visit RSPCA.

RSPCA have the discounted adoption fees semi-frequently so I’m sure the next one isn’t too far away.

Alternatively, if you decided to adopt an adult cat or an adolescent kitten (8-9 months old) I am pretty sure Flossie’s Kitten Rescue do a pretty reasonable adoption price for them – don’t quote me but I think it’s around $150 and includes desexing, microchipping, vaccinations, the whole shebang.

I’ll be looking into this further, part of what made me change my mind last minute was your prior comment about these services being willing to take the adoptee back if it really could not work out with the existing pet for some reason. I know my cat has a solo personality (ok a lot of cats do but yeh) and I did worrt about the stress I would be putting on her. So the idea of working with an agency before and after to help with the process is definitely appealing. And worth it I guess even if it does cost a bit more. I would still look to adopt ideally an adolescent male cat around 1yr of age.

If you see this reply today – Flossie’s Kitten Rescue are down at Belco Pets for an adoption day and they have some adolescent kitty cats with them… my personal favourite is Jamal – a gorgeous black boy kitty.

Mordd 12:21 am 28 May 16

crackerpants said :

buttermaker said :

Considered in adopting a kitten but unfortunately, the reduction in adoption fees finished on 25th May. I received this RiotACT email on 26th May! Mordd, I am thinking the same question re kitten more expensive then cat.

I might visit RSPCA.

RSPCA have the discounted adoption fees semi-frequently so I’m sure the next one isn’t too far away.

Alternatively, if you decided to adopt an adult cat or an adolescent kitten (8-9 months old) I am pretty sure Flossie’s Kitten Rescue do a pretty reasonable adoption price for them – don’t quote me but I think it’s around $150 and includes desexing, microchipping, vaccinations, the whole shebang.

I’ll be looking into this further, part of what made me change my mind last minute was your prior comment about these services being willing to take the adoptee back if it really could not work out with the existing pet for some reason. I know my cat has a solo personality (ok a lot of cats do but yeh) and I did worrt about the stress I would be putting on her. So the idea of working with an agency before and after to help with the process is definitely appealing. And worth it I guess even if it does cost a bit more. I would still look to adopt ideally an adolescent male cat around 1yr of age.

chiflean 7:43 pm 27 May 16

Mordd, I hope you also keep have easy access to credit or a savings fund if you ever do need to claim from your pet insurance (hopefully not, but you never know). I’m yet to find a pet insurer who doesn’t expect you to first cover all bills upfront, and then reimburse you (which can take a while).

It’s great that you are trying to prepare for potential vet bills though – you sound like a responsible pet owner. My gripe is really with people who think of animals as disposable goods or who abandon them when they’re not ‘fun’ any more (too sick, too old).

I’m more of a dog person myself, but I think cats deserve a decent life too.

Alexandra Craig 3:24 pm 27 May 16

buttermaker said :

Considered in adopting a kitten but unfortunately, the reduction in adoption fees finished on 25th May. I received this RiotACT email on 26th May! Mordd, I am thinking the same question re kitten more expensive then cat.

I might visit RSPCA.

RSPCA have the discounted adoption fees semi-frequently so I’m sure the next one isn’t too far away.

Alternatively, if you decided to adopt an adult cat or an adolescent kitten (8-9 months old) I am pretty sure Flossie’s Kitten Rescue do a pretty reasonable adoption price for them – don’t quote me but I think it’s around $150 and includes desexing, microchipping, vaccinations, the whole shebang.

TB 1:35 pm 27 May 16

Considered in adopting a kitten but unfortunately, the reduction in adoption fees finished on 25th May. I received this RiotACT email on 26th May! Mordd, I am thinking the same question re kitten more expensive then cat.

I might visit RSPCA.

Mordd 11:22 pm 25 May 16

waggamick said :

If you can’t afford a $300 upfront fee for a cat, how are you going to pay the vet bill if it gets sick? I don’t understand this logic. If you really can’t afford that fee, you can’t afford a cat. I also don’t understand why someone would be more motivated to buy a pet by a special price offer. The initial cost of a pet is nothing compared to the ongoing costs, and unless you’re planning on euthanasing the pet the second it gets sick, these costs are unavoidable.

Pet insurance, I pay a small amount every week or fortnight so it won’t be an issue if something happens. So far I haven’t had to claim on it though. Same reason I have health insurance (just extras cover though) even though im on a low income, if i need new glasses for example I don’t have to worry about having $400 up front.

Anyway I decided today to hold off on adopting a second cat for the moment for my own reasons. I may still do so in the future but for the moment I’ll continue to research it and think about it.

dustytrail 3:00 pm 25 May 16

Cats! They need to be kept indoors!

Families get conned into getting a kitten by their kids. I went through this way back with the “but Mummy, I will feed it, empty the kitty litter tray” etcetera. So “we” got a kitten. It cost a fortune to have it “de-sexed” and she mainly stayed indoors … sleeping, as cats do … but the novelty soon wore off and guess who ended up feeding and cleaning the litter tray!

I don’t particularly “like” cats. Did you guess? Would never have another one.

Having them de-sexed costs a lot but surely these ones have already had that? That’s what the “fee” is all about? De-sexed cats don’t want to roam and are usually quite happy to stay indoors to sleep (18 hours a day, minimum) and only whine when you get late home from work and they are demanding to be fed! They don’t need “exercise” nor “grooming” as such, so a rather ordinary pet for small children to learn about.

Do NOT get sucked in by their “cuteness”. Oh and cats can live for 20+ years too … owning a pet (any variety) is a life-long commitment.

Alexandra Craig 2:24 pm 25 May 16

HenryBG said :

waggamick said :

If you can’t afford a $300 upfront fee for a cat, how are you going to pay the vet bill if it gets sick? I don’t understand this logic. If you really can’t afford that fee, you can’t afford a cat. I also don’t understand why someone would be more motivated to buy a pet by a special price offer. The initial cost of a pet is nothing compared to the ongoing costs, and unless you’re planning on euthanasing the pet the second it gets sick, these costs are unavoidable.

I agree. However I can say hand-on-heart that it wasn’t the price reduction motivating us, it was the fact that they needed homes for cats, and we could offer one. We were down one cat through a sad tale I won’t share here, but as I said to my husband, if we’ve agreed we have room for two cats, then we have two cats.

It’s a week today since we adopted our new cat, and the introduction process is going well – I’ve been swapping bedding, beds, “zones”, food bowls etc, and had no hostility until they got within 2m of each other last night and the little one hissed – that was down to my poor management. I’m considering the feliway – great tip re the mozzie repeller, thanks!

2 weeks of no hostility is amazing! Don’t worry too much about the hiss – it was probably a bit of ‘oh my god I’m so close to the big cat so I must hiss to assert my authority because even though I am small I am a really big tough alley cat!’ Hehe 🙂

crackerpants 12:23 pm 25 May 16

waggamick said :

If you can’t afford a $300 upfront fee for a cat, how are you going to pay the vet bill if it gets sick? I don’t understand this logic. If you really can’t afford that fee, you can’t afford a cat. I also don’t understand why someone would be more motivated to buy a pet by a special price offer. The initial cost of a pet is nothing compared to the ongoing costs, and unless you’re planning on euthanasing the pet the second it gets sick, these costs are unavoidable.

I agree. However I can say hand-on-heart that it wasn’t the price reduction motivating us, it was the fact that they needed homes for cats, and we could offer one. We were down one cat through a sad tale I won’t share here, but as I said to my husband, if we’ve agreed we have room for two cats, then we have two cats.

It’s a week today since we adopted our new cat, and the introduction process is going well – I’ve been swapping bedding, beds, “zones”, food bowls etc, and had no hostility until they got within 2m of each other last night and the little one hissed – that was down to my poor management. I’m considering the feliway – great tip re the mozzie repeller, thanks!

Alexandra Craig 8:04 am 25 May 16

Masquara said :

Kimm said :

Re having more than one cat in the house, I remember watching a documentary where they filmed the cats in a village for weeks. Many owners of multiple cats thought their cats got along, but the films shows many only tolerated each other, avoiding each other as best they could. They would often have ‘their’ place in the house. That way they mixed with each other as little as possible. This appeared to be a surprise to their owners, who thought their cats were friends, when they weren’t, and would rather have lived as single cats.
The exception to this was a colony of semi-wild cats on a farm. They were all related and lived as a family. All the other cats in the documentary didn’t appear to want to live with other cats.
I used to have two cats and even though they were kittens together, their relationship was not all plain sailing. At one moment they would be sharing a bed and washing each other, but then one of them in particular would be trying to establish dominance, by biting his fellow cat on the balls, plus spraying in the house. I’m guessing the problem was having two male (both desexed) cats in the same household. It would have been worse, but they were inside/outside cats. This behaviour continued when I replaced one cat who died with another kitten. Perhaps this would work better if there had only been one male cat; ie. one male and one female cat, or perhaps only female cats. Anyway, I vowed never to have two male cats in the house together again.

The one thing I was told/read the most when i looked into this was if I have a female cat, definitely get a younger male cat for the best chance of a match. Everyone said 2 male cats together was the worst combination, and 2 female cats was normally ok but opposite sex mixtures have the best chance of working apparently. This comes from both stuff I read through google and my sister in law who has homed about 12 cats over the past 10 years usually with 2-4 in the house at a time.

I think it really depends on the cats personalities. We had a female cat (she was about 2 years old) when we got our boy kitten and they don’t get along. Well, the girl cat hates the boy cat. They co-exist but have a few spats (not bad enough to cause injury) every now and again haha.

We have a female foster kitten at the moment and she gets on well with the boy cat. The girl cat doesn’t really like her much but they tolerate each other 😛

chiflean 11:49 pm 24 May 16

If you can’t afford a $300 upfront fee for a cat, how are you going to pay the vet bill if it gets sick? I don’t understand this logic. If you really can’t afford that fee, you can’t afford a cat. I also don’t understand why someone would be more motivated to buy a pet by a special price offer. The initial cost of a pet is nothing compared to the ongoing costs, and unless you’re planning on euthanasing the pet the second it gets sick, these costs are unavoidable.

Mordd 8:28 pm 24 May 16

Kimm said :

Re having more than one cat in the house, I remember watching a documentary where they filmed the cats in a village for weeks. Many owners of multiple cats thought their cats got along, but the films shows many only tolerated each other, avoiding each other as best they could. They would often have ‘their’ place in the house. That way they mixed with each other as little as possible. This appeared to be a surprise to their owners, who thought their cats were friends, when they weren’t, and would rather have lived as single cats.
The exception to this was a colony of semi-wild cats on a farm. They were all related and lived as a family. All the other cats in the documentary didn’t appear to want to live with other cats.
I used to have two cats and even though they were kittens together, their relationship was not all plain sailing. At one moment they would be sharing a bed and washing each other, but then one of them in particular would be trying to establish dominance, by biting his fellow cat on the balls, plus spraying in the house. I’m guessing the problem was having two male (both desexed) cats in the same household. It would have been worse, but they were inside/outside cats. This behaviour continued when I replaced one cat who died with another kitten. Perhaps this would work better if there had only been one male cat; ie. one male and one female cat, or perhaps only female cats. Anyway, I vowed never to have two male cats in the house together again.

The one thing I was told/read the most when i looked into this was if I have a female cat, definitely get a younger male cat for the best chance of a match. Everyone said 2 male cats together was the worst combination, and 2 female cats was normally ok but opposite sex mixtures have the best chance of working apparently. This comes from both stuff I read through google and my sister in law who has homed about 12 cats over the past 10 years usually with 2-4 in the house at a time.

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