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RSPCA at CAT-pacity, adoption discounted till Wednesday

By Canfan - 20 May 2016 34

cats

The cattery at RSPCA ACT’s Weston shelter is at CAT-pacity! The organisation is looking to find new homes for 150 cats and kittens currently in care.

At the cattery in Weston there are 17 living enclosures for cats and kittens available for adoption. RSPCA ACT has increased this to 28 living enclosures and has no more room.

Over the past few months RSPCA ACT has seen an increase in the amount of cats and kittens coming into the shelter. Currently there are close to 50 cats and kittens available for adoption. There are also another 30 cats and kittens waiting to be desexed so they can be placed up for adoption. RSPCA ACT also has over 80 cats and kittens still in foster.

The organisation will continue to put additional cats and kittens up for adoption once there is room available in the cattery.

Adoption fee is as follows:

Cat (over 6 months)
Standard Adoption Fee: $195
CAT-pacity Adoption Fee: $99

Kittens
Standard Adoption Fee: $295
CAT-pacity Adoption Fee: $149

The reduction in adoption fee is available until next Wednesday, May 25.

What’s Your opinion?


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34 Responses to
RSPCA at CAT-pacity, adoption discounted till Wednesday
JazzyJess 9:58 pm 23 May 16

wildturkeycanoe said :

Leon said :

MERC600 said :

Why are the kittens more expensive than the cats? Just wondering.

I’d actually been thinking about adopting a kitten recently anyway, so I think I can help the RSPCA free up 1 spot at least. 🙂

I think it’s because everyone wants a kitten. I used to volunteer at the shelter, and they would often reduce the price further for older cats (5+) because it’s so much harder for them to find homes.

I saw the callout on Facebook on Tuesday night, and we adopted a mama cat on Wednesday morning. We already have an 8 month old cat, but so far so good. Cats are so easy, I’d really urge anyone to consider adopting one (as appropriate to their circumstances of course).

I wondered if that was the case. I have an old female cat atm, getting into her elderly years, she won’t be with me much longer most likely. That’s why I was thinking of adopting a kitten, thought that might make it easier for my current cat to get along with the new one, but with the cost differential I might try and get a younger male cat but no longer kitten anymore instead if they have a suitable option for me.

Any tips on introducing 2 cats the first time? I have googled a lot of links and read a bunch of really good instructions and am fairly confident on what I am going to need to do, seems its a 7-10 day process to do properly but if followed I am assured it should at least have them not tearing each others throats out if not becoming friends. Still keen for any tips from anyone who has done this before themselves. Cheers!

I’d suggest you read Cat vs. Cat by Pam Johnson-Bennett. From my own experience and coming from a long line of crazy cat ladies some cats just don’t like other cats and will never get along. Good luck if you decide to go ahead with it though.

Alexandra Craig 3:34 pm 23 May 16

Grail said :

Pandy said :

Mysteryman said :

The amount of unwanted animals is atrocious. There is no reason for a companion pet owner to not have their animal speyed. Perhaps if the registration was heavily graded it would alleviate this issue.

– Full (un-neutered) animal – $1000 registration per year.
– Neutered animal – $10.00 per year.

If the government were to offer subsidised (or free) desexing for two years after implementing this, it would not be any real hardship on pet owners.

That way, show and pedigree breeders could pay the registration easily and people just wanting a pet would also have no difficulty.

Cats don’t need to be registered in the ACT, only dogs.

Yep, I’m well aware of that anomalie. No-one has ever been able to tell me why it shouldn’t be changed other than: ‘That’s how it’s always been’, or, the firmly held belief that, as cat owners, they should automatically be exempt to any rule that is imposed upon any other animal owner.

I’d be more than happy to register my cats. And I would welcome the government enforcing all the animal based laws that are in place. The state of animal welfare in the ACT will never change unless we start to see some consequences for those doing the wrong thing.

No_Nose 1:01 pm 23 May 16

Pandy said :

Mysteryman said :

The amount of unwanted animals is atrocious. There is no reason for a companion pet owner to not have their animal speyed. Perhaps if the registration was heavily graded it would alleviate this issue.

– Full (un-neutered) animal – $1000 registration per year.
– Neutered animal – $10.00 per year.

If the government were to offer subsidised (or free) desexing for two years after implementing this, it would not be any real hardship on pet owners.

That way, show and pedigree breeders could pay the registration easily and people just wanting a pet would also have no difficulty.

Cats don’t need to be registered in the ACT, only dogs.

Yep, I’m well aware of that anomalie. No-one has ever been able to tell me why it shouldn’t be changed other than: ‘That’s how it’s always been’, or, the firmly held belief that, as cat owners, they should automatically be exempt to any rule that is imposed upon any other animal owner.

Alexandra Craig 11:22 am 23 May 16

Sorry – I should have expanded more on my last comment. The reason why I believe it’s easier to introduce a cat adopted from a small rescue as opposed to the RSPCA is because there is constant support from a rescue group. You can go there and chat about your needs, your cats needs, what type of kitten you’re looking for etc and then they will guide you through the whole process. There’s so much support from these rescue groups and if things don’t work out after a few weeks they will happily take the new kitten back and refund your adoption fee. Don’t get me wrong, the RSPCA does fantastic work, but if you need a hands on approach with a lot of support the rescue groups are definitely the way to go. 🙂

Alexandra Craig 11:17 am 23 May 16

Mysteryman said :

The amount of unwanted animals is atrocious. There is no reason for a companion pet owner to not have their animal speyed. Perhaps if the registration was heavily graded it would alleviate this issue.

– Full (un-neutered) animal – $1000 registration per year.
– Neutered animal – $10.00 per year.

If the government were to offer subsidised (or free) desexing for two years after implementing this, it would not be any real hardship on pet owners.

That way, show and pedigree breeders could pay the registration easily and people just wanting a pet would also have no difficulty.

Cats don’t need to be registered in the ACT, only dogs.

I run a cat desexing program and honestly, the ACT has all these fantastic laws around mandatory desexing and fines for people who backyard breed but they don’t get enforced. There’s no point having these laws if they’re not enforced. It is highly frustrating.

MERC600 said :

Why are the kittens more expensive than the cats? Just wondering.

I’d actually been thinking about adopting a kitten recently anyway, so I think I can help the RSPCA free up 1 spot at least. 🙂

Cats are harder to adopt out – so the cheaper price is to make them a bit more attractive 🙂 If you don’t have any luck at the RSPCA you can also check out some fab local independent rescue groups like Flossie’s Kitten Rescue, Leah’s Pawsitive Future and Pickles Playmates Animal Rescue. They do an excellent job and don’t receive any government funding – they do all their own fundraising 🙂

MERC600 said :

Why are the kittens more expensive than the cats? Just wondering.

I’d actually been thinking about adopting a kitten recently anyway, so I think I can help the RSPCA free up 1 spot at least. 🙂

I think it’s because everyone wants a kitten. I used to volunteer at the shelter, and they would often reduce the price further for older cats (5+) because it’s so much harder for them to find homes.

I saw the callout on Facebook on Tuesday night, and we adopted a mama cat on Wednesday morning. We already have an 8 month old cat, but so far so good. Cats are so easy, I’d really urge anyone to consider adopting one (as appropriate to their circumstances of course).

I wondered if that was the case. I have an old female cat atm, getting into her elderly years, she won’t be with me much longer most likely. That’s why I was thinking of adopting a kitten, thought that might make it easier for my current cat to get along with the new one, but with the cost differential I might try and get a younger male cat but no longer kitten anymore instead if they have a suitable option for me.

Any tips on introducing 2 cats the first time? I have googled a lot of links and read a bunch of really good instructions and am fairly confident on what I am going to need to do, seems its a 7-10 day process to do properly but if followed I am assured it should at least have them not tearing each others throats out if not becoming friends. Still keen for any tips from anyone who has done this before themselves. Cheers!

This is where I would definitely recommend adopting from a small scale rescue rather than the RSPCA. You can do the whole introducing process much easier. I believe the best way to do it is to collect a blanket from the rescue group that your soon-to-be brand new kitty has been sleeping on (about 3 days before bringing him/her home) and allowing your cat to smell it and sus it out. This way when you bring new kitty home it’s not a complete shock to the system for your cat. When kitty comes home, keep them in a bathroom/laundry/other small room for a few days so they can settle. This way they can also meet each other through sniffing under the door. After a day or two of sniffing they can meet face to face. I am paranoid so I always try and have a second person with me in case things go badly (this rarely happens). Don’t be too worried if your cat goes mental at the new kitty. They will probably be angry at you too, but they get over it. I do a few face to face encounters, 10-15 mins each, every day for a few days before I let them have a whole day together. Investing in a Feliway diffuser is also worthwhile. It releases a pheremone into the air that only cats can smell and it calms them down. They’re expensive but the cheapest I’ve found are on Pacific Pets online. Good luck! 🙂

HenryBG 10:42 am 23 May 16

rosscoact said :

I wonder if this segment could be incorporated into the story about pre-made home delivered meals – San choy meow anyone?
Seriously though, with the clamp down on cat ownership in newer suburbs, requirements for extravagant cat containment apparatus and such, the writing was on the wall for these refugees. It is becoming so costly to own a pet and so difficult to keep up with the laws, people are simply doing things illegally or dumping their animal at the nearest reserve, hoping it doesn’t return. You also have the risk of the adopted animal just jumping the fence and never being seen again, unlike MOST dogs who will stay in their yard because they cannot jump that high.

I agree with mew.

Domestic felines represent a total catastrophe for the environment, so it seems completely irrespawnsable for the RSPCA to be purrsuading people to buy more of them by reducing prices.

wildturkeycanoe 4:37 am 23 May 16

I wonder if this segment could be incorporated into the story about pre-made home delivered meals – San choy meow anyone?
Seriously though, with the clamp down on cat ownership in newer suburbs, requirements for extravagant cat containment apparatus and such, the writing was on the wall for these refugees. It is becoming so costly to own a pet and so difficult to keep up with the laws, people are simply doing things illegally or dumping their animal at the nearest reserve, hoping it doesn’t return. You also have the risk of the adopted animal just jumping the fence and never being seen again, unlike MOST dogs who will stay in their yard because they cannot jump that high.

Masquara 6:24 pm 22 May 16

wildturkeycanoe said :

Leon said :

MERC600 said :

Why are the kittens more expensive than the cats? Just wondering.

I’d actually been thinking about adopting a kitten recently anyway, so I think I can help the RSPCA free up 1 spot at least. 🙂

I think it’s because everyone wants a kitten. I used to volunteer at the shelter, and they would often reduce the price further for older cats (5+) because it’s so much harder for them to find homes.

I saw the callout on Facebook on Tuesday night, and we adopted a mama cat on Wednesday morning. We already have an 8 month old cat, but so far so good. Cats are so easy, I’d really urge anyone to consider adopting one (as appropriate to their circumstances of course).

I wondered if that was the case. I have an old female cat atm, getting into her elderly years, she won’t be with me much longer most likely. That’s why I was thinking of adopting a kitten, thought that might make it easier for my current cat to get along with the new one, but with the cost differential I might try and get a younger male cat but no longer kitten anymore instead if they have a suitable option for me.

Any tips on introducing 2 cats the first time? I have googled a lot of links and read a bunch of really good instructions and am fairly confident on what I am going to need to do, seems its a 7-10 day process to do properly but if followed I am assured it should at least have them not tearing each others throats out if not becoming friends. Still keen for any tips from anyone who has done this before themselves. Cheers!

I can only report complete failure with getting two cats together in adulthood. We took in a stray, and Cats 1 and 2 ended up dividing up the house and hissing at each other when their paths crossed. I didn’t investigate medication from the vet but perhaps that might have helped. Fortunately, it turned out that the vet’s initial scan hadn’t picked up a chip in cat 2, a stray, because the scanner battery had run out. Six months later the chip was picked up and the cat was reunited with its owner. Cat 1 didn’t have a second cat foisted on it again.

Mordd 1:01 pm 22 May 16

Mysteryman said :

The amount of unwanted animals is atrocious. There is no reason for a companion pet owner to not have their animal speyed. Perhaps if the registration was heavily graded it would alleviate this issue.

– Full (un-neutered) animal – $1000 registration per year.
– Neutered animal – $10.00 per year.

If the government were to offer subsidised (or free) desexing for two years after implementing this, it would not be any real hardship on pet owners.

That way, show and pedigree breeders could pay the registration easily and people just wanting a pet would also have no difficulty.

I like this idea, but you would fine that if ppl hadn’t got the cat neutered, they simply wouldn’t register it either to avoid the cost. Nice in theory, probably wouldn’t work in practice unfortunately.

Mordd 12:58 pm 22 May 16

Leon said :

MERC600 said :

Why are the kittens more expensive than the cats? Just wondering.

I’d actually been thinking about adopting a kitten recently anyway, so I think I can help the RSPCA free up 1 spot at least. 🙂

I think it’s because everyone wants a kitten. I used to volunteer at the shelter, and they would often reduce the price further for older cats (5+) because it’s so much harder for them to find homes.

I saw the callout on Facebook on Tuesday night, and we adopted a mama cat on Wednesday morning. We already have an 8 month old cat, but so far so good. Cats are so easy, I’d really urge anyone to consider adopting one (as appropriate to their circumstances of course).

I wondered if that was the case. I have an old female cat atm, getting into her elderly years, she won’t be with me much longer most likely. That’s why I was thinking of adopting a kitten, thought that might make it easier for my current cat to get along with the new one, but with the cost differential I might try and get a younger male cat but no longer kitten anymore instead if they have a suitable option for me.

Any tips on introducing 2 cats the first time? I have googled a lot of links and read a bunch of really good instructions and am fairly confident on what I am going to need to do, seems its a 7-10 day process to do properly but if followed I am assured it should at least have them not tearing each others throats out if not becoming friends. Still keen for any tips from anyone who has done this before themselves. Cheers!

Masquara 11:50 am 22 May 16

MERC600 said :

Why are the kittens more expensive than the cats? Just wondering.

I’d actually been thinking about adopting a kitten recently anyway, so I think I can help the RSPCA free up 1 spot at least. 🙂

Look at the cats too – I’ve adopted two older cats – no need to house train them, and mine have been wonderful. If you adopt an adult, their personality has developed which makes choosing one less risky re temperament traits. Plus it’s nice knowing you may have saved them from euthanasia (regardless of what the rescue places tell you, I doubt whether there really is a “no animals are ever euthanised” one).

Mysteryman 9:56 am 22 May 16

Leon said :

.. Cats are so easy, I’d really urge anyone to consider adopting one (as appropriate to their circumstances of course).

My neighbour thinks so, too. She lets the damn thing wander around the neighbourhood day and night, urinating all over the place, digging up other people’s gardens, and fighting whenever it feels like it. So easy to look after when you aren’t responsible! (I’m not saying that you aren’t responsible, crackerpants – but there are a lot people think it’s easy because they don’t take any responsibility for their cats)

I suspect her cat will end up at the RSPCA should one of her neighbours decide to trap it.

crackerpants 8:08 am 22 May 16

MERC600 said :

Why are the kittens more expensive than the cats? Just wondering.

I’d actually been thinking about adopting a kitten recently anyway, so I think I can help the RSPCA free up 1 spot at least. 🙂

I think it’s because everyone wants a kitten. I used to volunteer at the shelter, and they would often reduce the price further for older cats (5+) because it’s so much harder for them to find homes.

I saw the callout on Facebook on Tuesday night, and we adopted a mama cat on Wednesday morning. We already have an 8 month old cat, but so far so good. Cats are so easy, I’d really urge anyone to consider adopting one (as appropriate to their circumstances of course).

Mordd 12:29 am 22 May 16

Why are the kittens more expensive than the cats? Just wondering.

I’d actually been thinking about adopting a kitten recently anyway, so I think I can help the RSPCA free up 1 spot at least. 🙂

No_Nose 11:44 pm 21 May 16

The amount of unwanted animals is atrocious. There is no reason for a companion pet owner to not have their animal speyed. Perhaps if the registration was heavily graded it would alleviate this issue.

– Full (un-neutered) animal – $1000 registration per year.
– Neutered animal – $10.00 per year.

If the government were to offer subsidised (or free) desexing for two years after implementing this, it would not be any real hardship on pet owners.

That way, show and pedigree breeders could pay the registration easily and people just wanting a pet would also have no difficulty.

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