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Take a slideshow tour of ACT’s expanded prison

By Charlotte Harper 25 February 2016 17

Shane Rattenbury

Expansion works at the Alexander Maconochie Centre are now complete and detainees who were moved to a temporary jail at Symonston in mid-2015 due to overcrowding at the main prison returned early this week.

The Symonston site will remain a weekend detention institution only from this week.

Corrections Minister Shane Rattenbury toured sections of the expanded jail yesterday, providing media with an opportunity to take photographs inside the jail.

Take a virtual tour of the expanded Alexander Maconochie Centre at Hume here

The Greens MLA said the new Accommodation Unit provided an additional 112 beds, which would help to ease overcrowding issues. The new facilities, along with the Special Care Centre, which had capacity for double-bunking, would bring the total capacity of the AMC to 539 beds up from 370 before the start of the project.

There were 420 detainees in residence yesterday, with between 410 and 420 for the past month, according to Mr Rattenbury. Around three months ago numbers reached an all-time peak in the high 420s.

“This expansion project is part of a multi-pronged approach to address the increasing population pressures that we have been experiencing over recent months and years,” the Corrections Minister said.

“While in the short term we needed to expand the physical space within the AMC, we have also been working on strategies to reduce the number of people going in to the prison and the number of people reoffending post-release.

“This includes work within the Justice Reform Strategy, which is focused on enhancing the legal framework for sentencing and restorative justice as well as programs such as Throughcare, which supports detainees as they transition back into the community and programs that detainees can engage with during their sentence that address specific issues or behaviours.”

General Manager, Custodial operations, ACT Corrective Services Don Taylor said the new building would house a number of different cohorts, including detainees that would benefit from more programmatic intervention.

“I think the key thing around this and the special care centre is the capability that we’ve got now of managing the prison in a totally different way,” he said.

Don Taylor

“By separating detainees that we think shouldn’t be together, and that’s cohorts, so we have mainstream, we have people that are a wee bit concerned about being in certain areas of the prison, and so instead of having to isolate them too much, we’ve created these environments so that we can have them running as a normal cohort in the prison.”

Mr Taylor said the prison had also hired 20 additional correctional staff.

Detainees remained locked up throughout the media visit.

The bright new section we visited included outdoor gym equipment, an interview room, a meeting room, a laundry, a large dining space featuring a kitchen and two telephones and a series of cells, with their own seat-less toilets, basic showers, televisions, desk-style workspaces and chairs. It was filled with natural light with furnishing and fittings in silver and bright green.

Prison wing

The views from windows were less cheerful, with most looking out onto barbed wire, electric fencing and empty, dry paddocks, though there are flowerbeds scattered throughout the prison grounds and even a BBQ facility in one of the exercise areas.

While the prisoners will have everything they need, the facilities are far from luxurious. The pillows and mattresses are covered in a tough waterproof fabric, with the latter very firm and half the thickness of a standard bed mattress. These sit on hard built-in bed bases in either bunk or twin bed formation.

The cell doors include hatches for passing medications, food and drinks through to detainees.

The Alexander Maconochie Centre Expansion Project was delivered four months early with savings of $7 million, which will be used to fund further development of prison industries within the jail, as previously reported by the RiotACT.

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17 Responses to
Take a slideshow tour of ACT’s expanded prison
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rubaiyat 10:00 am 01 Mar 16

dungfungus said :

I looked hard but I couldn’t find the words “drug free” anywhere.
What a monumental failure our detention centre is.

Why? Who escaped?

Or just more predictable dungfungerism?

dungfungus 11:18 pm 29 Feb 16

Charlotte Harper said :

Oh I see. I was responding to a post that included options a, b and c

I can see now that you meant “(a)”.
Sorry.

Masquara 7:50 pm 29 Feb 16

dungfungus said :

I looked hard but I couldn’t find the words “drug free” anywhere.
What a monumental failure our detention centre is.

Are the prisoners allowed cigarettes? anyone know?

wildturkeycanoe 5:13 pm 29 Feb 16

So criminals get 112 more beds, now housing 539, whilst Calvary hospital still only has 250 beds. Who is more important in society?

dungfungus 2:47 pm 29 Feb 16

Charlotte Harper said :

How so? Other areas of government are looking to the team behind the jail expansion for guidance on managing their projects because they came in under budget and finished ahead of schedule. It’s a), surely.

” It’s a)”
What does this mean? That is what is confusing.

dungfungus 11:25 am 29 Feb 16

Charlotte Harper said :

Mr Rattenbury said directorate staff involved are now consulting with other sectors of ACT Government to help manage projects across the territory as successfully, @Ian, so I do think it’s a)

Your response only confuses the question.

    Charlotte Harper 12:05 pm 29 Feb 16

    How so? Other areas of government are looking to the team behind the jail expansion for guidance on managing their projects because they came in under budget and finished ahead of schedule. It’s a), surely.

Ian 11:13 pm 28 Feb 16

I wonder if coming in $7m under budget means:
(a) they were actually efficient
(b) the budget was really fat
(c) they didn’t lowball the initial budget to make it more attractive to the approvers.

    Charlotte Harper 11:18 am 29 Feb 16

    Mr Rattenbury said directorate staff involved are now consulting with other sectors of ACT Government to help manage projects across the territory as successfully, @Ian, so I do think it’s a)

gooterz 5:58 pm 28 Feb 16

rommeldog56 said :

So, let me get this right.

When the prison was originally planned & built, the ACt Labor/Greens Govt were told point blank that it was way too small.

Now they hold up the “expansion” as a great achievement – as a win and a chance for positive publicity.

I wonder how much more Ratepayers $ this expansion has cost compared to what it would have cost if it was originally built to that capacity – as it should have been.

What you mean like the GDE and all the other half done projects that then have to be redone.
ECD project took double the costs and took twice as long as they didn’t factor in rain when building a dam to catch rain!

“Around three months ago numbers reached an all-time peak in the high 420s.”

Hopefully not all the prisoners are in the high 420’s.

miz 9:41 am 28 Feb 16

rommeldog56 said :

So, let me get this right.

When the prison was originally planned & built, the ACt Labor/Greens Govt were told point blank that it was way too small.

Now they hold up the “expansion” as a great achievement – as a win and a chance for positive publicity.

I wonder how much more Ratepayers $ this expansion has cost compared to what it would have cost if it was originally built to that capacity – as it should have been.

I call it GDE syndrome – a disorder common to ACT Govt, in which the government chooses not to do something properly in the first instance, and then attempts to justify the expensive patch jobs that follow.

dungfungus 8:46 am 28 Feb 16

rommeldog56 said :

So, let me get this right.

When the prison was originally planned & built, the ACt Labor/Greens Govt were told point blank that it was way too small.

Now they hold up the “expansion” as a great achievement – as a win and a chance for positive publicity.

I wonder how much more Ratepayers $ this expansion has cost compared to what it would have cost if it was originally built to that capacity – as it should have been.

Remember the GDE?

rommeldog56 10:53 am 27 Feb 16

So, let me get this right.

When the prison was originally planned & built, the ACt Labor/Greens Govt were told point blank that it was way too small.

Now they hold up the “expansion” as a great achievement – as a win and a chance for positive publicity.

I wonder how much more Ratepayers $ this expansion has cost compared to what it would have cost if it was originally built to that capacity – as it should have been.

James_Ryan 10:01 am 27 Feb 16

dungfungus said :

I looked hard but I couldn’t find the words “drug free” anywhere.
What a monumental failure our detention centre is.

To be fair to ACT Corrective Services, operating a “drug free” prison is not a measure of success or failure. If it were, every prison in the world would be a failure.

We have a prison where detainees have access to drugs (just like every other prison). Where ACT Corrective Services fails monumentally is in failing to respond effectively to that reality.

MERC600 2:57 pm 26 Feb 16

No mention of how much a day it costs us per prisoner.
About a year ago we were level peggin’ with Tassy on being the highest cost.. But i wonder if we have managed to pass them..

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2015/02/02/how-much-does-it-cost-keep-people-australian-jails

dungfungus 8:04 am 26 Feb 16

I looked hard but I couldn’t find the words “drug free” anywhere.
What a monumental failure our detention centre is.

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