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How to remove house details from real estate websites?

By Sayit - 12 August 2012 13

hi all,

wondering once you’ve purchased a property, how is the best way to get the details about your house (photos, purchase price, floorplans etc.) removed from websites? (allhomes.com.au, real estate agent & property price websites).

If I email the agent & allhomes is this the best way? Is there any legislation about this that I can use to back this? So far the most relevant information i could find has been from the States. Thanks in advance….

What’s Your opinion?


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13 Responses to
How to remove house details from real estate websites?
Sayit 9:07 pm 13 Aug 12

Hi all, thanks for all the comments.

* The realestate agent’s response is that apparently the company who controls the real estate agency’s website gather and saves the information for “research” and the real estate agency has no control over what the company does. The agent suspects the information is in the public domain once it is sold.

* I’ve sent a request to allhomes. Am hoping it will come off soon.

* Joys of the internet …one person’s privacy is another’s stickybeak heaven. From what i’ve seen, wayback doesn’t seem to capture 100% of everything everyday?

VYBerlinaV8_is_back 5:00 pm 13 Aug 12

It’s a waste of time. Sites like the Internet Wayback Machine take copies of this stuff, and it can be accessed later even if removed from the original site.

Once you put something on the Internet, it usually stays there.

Holden Caulfield 3:35 pm 13 Aug 12

Bluenomi said :

Or the house has never been sold before. Most houses don’t seem to have the very first time it was purchased as just a block, I’ve check a few houses I know and that first sale isn’t on any of them.

Mrs C and I bought land for our first home back in 1999 and it’s listed on allhomes. I think their land sales database starts from the mid-90s??? But maybe not all new homes are still added?

Bluenomi 3:15 pm 13 Aug 12

Holden Caulfield said :

Jivrashia said :

You can probably remove the listing and the pictures, but I think the price listing is in the public domain and cannot be taken down…

Here is an example of a house in Griffith that I randomly picked.
Last sold in 1998 for a price of 1/2 million.

Although, you do sometimes see houses with no past sales data, so there must be a way, which I guess would be as simple as putting in a simple request to allhomes.

Or the house has never been sold before. Most houses don’t seem to have the very first time it was purchased as just a block, I’ve check a few houses I know and that first sale isn’t on any of them.

Holden Caulfield 2:30 pm 13 Aug 12

Jivrashia said :

You can probably remove the listing and the pictures, but I think the price listing is in the public domain and cannot be taken down…

Here is an example of a house in Griffith that I randomly picked.
Last sold in 1998 for a price of 1/2 million.

Although, you do sometimes see houses with no past sales data, so there must be a way, which I guess would be as simple as putting in a simple request to allhomes.

G-Fresh 2:18 pm 13 Aug 12

Jivrashia said :

You can probably remove the listing and the pictures, but I think the price listing is in the public domain and cannot be taken down…

Here is an example of a house in Griffith that I randomly picked.
Last sold in 1998 for a price of 1/2 million.

Where are the photos

Jivrashia 2:09 pm 13 Aug 12

You can probably remove the listing and the pictures, but I think the price listing is in the public domain and cannot be taken down…

Here is an example of a house in Griffith that I randomly picked.
Last sold in 1998 for a price of 1/2 million.

davo101 11:39 am 13 Aug 12

dtc said :

Silentforce said :

For discerning housebreakers, Allhomes appears to be a rich catalogue containing a smorgasboard of information relating to entry points, security, escape routes, occupancy, obstacles etc. This applies during the selling period and afterwards. One may argue that anyone can attend an exhibition and discover the same information; but agents normally take viewers details and real estate sites can be viewed anonymously by the public.

If you think the average burglar plans ahead and gets information off the web and does a walkthrough and establishes escape routes and plan B and back ups, then you have been watching too many Ocean 11/12/13 films

The average burglar stumbles a few 100m and knocks on the door of a random house. If no one is home they go around the back and jemmy a window.

+1

I think Silentforce may be over estimating the average intelligence of your common burglar. Based on the break-ins that have occurred in our development they wait till you go out and then rummage through every part of the house until they find all of the stuff they want. The last one got caught in the act of trying to break-in. Seriously who’d think that 6~8pm on a week-night would be a good time to try? It’s not as if the owners are going to be arriving at home from work….

Madam Cholet 11:30 am 13 Aug 12

I was advised many moons ago to ask the real estate websites themselves. I asked to get ours remived. I would hazard a guess that 7 years later they are still there as I gave up. Good luck.

dtc 11:16 am 13 Aug 12

Silentforce said :

For discerning housebreakers, Allhomes appears to be a rich catalogue containing a smorgasboard of information relating to entry points, security, escape routes, occupancy, obstacles etc. This applies during the selling period and afterwards. One may argue that anyone can attend an exhibition and discover the same information; but agents normally take viewers details and real estate sites can be viewed anonymously by the public.

If you think the average burglar plans ahead and gets information off the web and does a walkthrough and establishes escape routes and plan B and back ups, then you have been watching too many Ocean 11/12/13 films

The average burglar stumbles a few 100m and knocks on the door of a random house. If no one is home they go around the back and jemmy a window.

Bluenomi 11:02 am 13 Aug 12

But by removing them you’re ruining everyone’s fun! I love nothing more than sticky beaking at houses, sometimes I go back to the old photos of my place to see how much we’ve improved the place.

Remember though, just taking it off allhomes won’t get rid of all copies. Other people could have asked for copies of the contract with floor plans, saved the photos off the website, taking photos at the open home etc. Once something is on the internet, you are never going to be able to control the spread of it

Silentforce 9:17 am 12 Aug 12

Sayit

The best option I know is to contact the advertiser and request that all advertisements be withdrawn on their site and affiliated sites.

For discerning housebreakers, Allhomes appears to be a rich catalogue containing a smorgasboard of information relating to entry points, security, escape routes, occupancy, obstacles etc. This applies during the selling period and afterwards. One may argue that anyone can attend an exhibition and discover the same information; but agents normally take viewers details and real estate sites can be viewed anonymously by the public.

gasman 9:17 am 12 Aug 12

We emailed allhomes and asked them to remove all pictures for privacy reasons. Stress the privacy issue. Ours was listed on allhomes exclusively, no agents, so I can’t comment on agents. Allhomes were very obliging and removed in less than 24 hours.

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