Troy Simpson Announces Intention to Contest Fraser Seat

Troy Simpson 2 March 2011 44

This week, I have announced that I will stand as an Independent for the seat of Fraser at the next Federal election. I am contesting the seat in order to offer voters in Fraser a credible alternative to Labor and Liberal.

I stand for small-l liberal, progressive social views, including support for same-sex marriage and a more human asylum-seeker policy.

I also put myself forward as a credible choice for small-business, with a decade of lived experience running a multi-award-winning company. My record also includes a successful legal career, academic credentials, and a career as a published author.

I want to give Labor voters a chance to tell Labor to stop taking their votes for granted.

I want to give Liberal voters the chance to support someone who will fight to win the seat and not merely bridge the gap between Labor and second-place.

For all voters, I offer fact-based, common-sense solutions to our problems, free from dogma, factions, and machine politics.

As an Independent, I can say what I believe—and believe what I say. Independence of mind is good for governance and good for the people of Fraser.

I ask voters in Fraser to look beyond the two Parties. Vote for your values. Don’t sign away your vote to the Parties’ factions and spin doctors.

My campaign — our campaign — starts now, so that we can build support for the hard task ahead.

Follow me on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/troy.simpson.for.fraser), follow me on Twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/Simpson4Fraser), and comment on my website (http://www.troy-simpson.com).

Rage against the machine.


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44 Responses to Troy Simpson Announces Intention to Contest Fraser Seat
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troysimp troysimp 5:47 am 09 Mar 11

TheObserver said :

Men are from Mars
Women are from Venus
Politicians are from Uranus.

Good luck in Fraser – one of the most rusted on ALP seats in the known universe.

But they haven’t discovered Troy World yet, where anything is possible.

TheObserver TheObserver 5:11 pm 08 Mar 11

Men are from Mars
Women are from Venus
Politicians are from Uranus.

Good luck in Fraser – one of the most rusted on ALP seats in the known universe.

troysimp troysimp 3:50 pm 04 Mar 11

triffid said :

troysimp said :

Intriguing. Any chance you and I can connect elsewhere — either online (eg, on Facebook) or, even better, the real world, for a chat?

Yeah . . . could probably do that. Let me have a think about it, though (I’d have to break a promise to myself).

Even more intriguing. Look me up on Facebook, if you like, so that you will see I am not all that scary 😉

triffid triffid 3:24 pm 04 Mar 11

troysimp said :

Intriguing. Any chance you and I can connect elsewhere — either online (eg, on Facebook) or, even better, the real world, for a chat?

Yeah . . . could probably do that. Let me have a think about it, though (I’d have to break a promise to myself).

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 9:49 am 04 Mar 11

troysimp said :

georgesgenitals said :

troysimp said :

georgesgenitals said :

troysimp said :

georgesgenitals said :

Good stuff Troy.

georgesgenitals: My favourite message so far! Thank you for your encouragement.

🙂

You and I have actually met and spoken, and I thought you were pretty switched on.

I don’t live in your area, but I hope you get a guernsey.

Cheers.

Thanks. Any clues as to your real identity? 🙂

Not a chance!! 🙂

Hmm… Can you give me a clue? Does your first name start with the initial J?

No.

And that’s the last bit of information I’m giving you! 🙂

troysimp troysimp 4:01 am 04 Mar 11

georgesgenitals said :

troysimp said :

georgesgenitals said :

troysimp said :

georgesgenitals said :

Good stuff Troy.

georgesgenitals: My favourite message so far! Thank you for your encouragement.

🙂

You and I have actually met and spoken, and I thought you were pretty switched on.

I don’t live in your area, but I hope you get a guernsey.

Cheers.

Thanks. Any clues as to your real identity? 🙂

Not a chance!! 🙂

Hmm… Can you give me a clue? Does your first name start with the initial J?

housebound housebound 12:24 am 04 Mar 11

We have to give you credit for having a go, but if you are just Labor/Green without the tag, then what policy difference would you be offering?

Anyway, can you do a good penguin imitation?

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 8:13 pm 03 Mar 11

troysimp said :

georgesgenitals said :

troysimp said :

georgesgenitals said :

Good stuff Troy.

georgesgenitals: My favourite message so far! Thank you for your encouragement.

🙂

You and I have actually met and spoken, and I thought you were pretty switched on.

I don’t live in your area, but I hope you get a guernsey.

Cheers.

Thanks. Any clues as to your real identity? 🙂

Not a chance!! 🙂

troysimp troysimp 8:05 pm 03 Mar 11

triffid said :

troysimp said :

triffid said :

troysimp said :

Thanks for your feedback. I do have some lived experience to add to the mix — eg, the day-to-day running of a small business, the challenges of writing and getting books published (these are not law books, but rather humour books), some experience in caring for the sick and support for the mentally ill, etc. And I will be posting on my website soon the philosophical bedrock on which I will base my decision-making. One of the principles that will guide me is diversity of experience and perspectives. So, please do continue contributing your ideas and knowledge.

OK, fair enough. I will look forward to that with interest. But (and without wishing to rush to the last page of any manifesto currently in draft), can you indicate to me just what (and maybe a little of how and why) you might prefer to see occuring in the following public policy areas?:
A) family law
B) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs
C) tax transfers in the context of social equity / inclusion

As Kevin Rudd might say, “in due season”. Right now, it’s Internet filters and parralel importation of books. But your issues are definitely on my list.

Indeed, I am very familiar with the vernacular oft preferred by the Member for Griffith. With all respect and fraternity, though, Troy, those are not ‘my’ issues, rather they are among THE issues (Aborignal and Torres Strait Islander issues in particular). While they might not appear all that central to the concerns of the good burghers of Fraser, they nevertheless deserve some considerable priority of attention. That is especially the case if you are proposing to capture, and ossify to your benefit, those disaffected Labor voters you seek to attract. Those matters represent ones that actually present as an opportunity for the electorate to get a very accurate feel for the ideological basis of your platform (the ‘electorate’ doesn’t think in such terms, by the way, more subconscously making an allignment or otherwise on that basis. See Scarbrough, E. in the context of consonant dissonance).

I’m not having a go at you, Troy, though it might seem it. I, too, respect anyone who makes the committment to run for public office. But, mate, we do have more than enough lawyers in both Houses . . . really, we do. I know, I know, you have some real world experience as well. But, ask yourself this (‘cos others will be a damn sight more forceful than I ‘in due season’) . . . what do you really know of, say, the actual affects of the operation of the current family law regime on the people ensnared in its pernicious viscitudes? From where do you get those insights? Do you really place internet filters above the circumstances faced daily by the First People of Australia; irrespective of where they might live? Have you any insight into the critical cultural nuances and imperatives that systemically impair the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, yes, living even in Fraser? How can you be certain that your world view isn’t imbued with a permanent patina courtesy of your legal academic background? Just askin’ . . .

Just so you know . . . I am not a party operative (though I have been). But I am aware enough to know why I (and my social circle) have abandoned the mainstream parties: same reasons the electorate has. Question is, are you?

Intriguing. Any chance you and I can connect elsewhere — either online (eg, on Facebook) or, even better, the real world, for a chat?

troysimp troysimp 8:01 pm 03 Mar 11

georgesgenitals said :

troysimp said :

georgesgenitals said :

Good stuff Troy.

georgesgenitals: My favourite message so far! Thank you for your encouragement.

🙂

You and I have actually met and spoken, and I thought you were pretty switched on.

I don’t live in your area, but I hope you get a guernsey.

Cheers.

Thanks. Any clues as to your real identity? 🙂

triffid triffid 3:52 pm 03 Mar 11

troysimp said :

triffid said :

troysimp said :

Thanks for your feedback. I do have some lived experience to add to the mix — eg, the day-to-day running of a small business, the challenges of writing and getting books published (these are not law books, but rather humour books), some experience in caring for the sick and support for the mentally ill, etc. And I will be posting on my website soon the philosophical bedrock on which I will base my decision-making. One of the principles that will guide me is diversity of experience and perspectives. So, please do continue contributing your ideas and knowledge.

OK, fair enough. I will look forward to that with interest. But (and without wishing to rush to the last page of any manifesto currently in draft), can you indicate to me just what (and maybe a little of how and why) you might prefer to see occuring in the following public policy areas?:
A) family law
B) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs
C) tax transfers in the context of social equity / inclusion

As Kevin Rudd might say, “in due season”. Right now, it’s Internet filters and parralel importation of books. But your issues are definitely on my list.

Indeed, I am very familiar with the vernacular oft preferred by the Member for Griffith. With all respect and fraternity, though, Troy, those are not ‘my’ issues, rather they are among THE issues (Aborignal and Torres Strait Islander issues in particular). While they might not appear all that central to the concerns of the good burghers of Fraser, they nevertheless deserve some considerable priority of attention. That is especially the case if you are proposing to capture, and ossify to your benefit, those disaffected Labor voters you seek to attract. Those matters represent ones that actually present as an opportunity for the electorate to get a very accurate feel for the ideological basis of your platform (the ‘electorate’ doesn’t think in such terms, by the way, more subconscously making an allignment or otherwise on that basis. See Scarbrough, E. in the context of consonant dissonance).

I’m not having a go at you, Troy, though it might seem it. I, too, respect anyone who makes the committment to run for public office. But, mate, we do have more than enough lawyers in both Houses . . . really, we do. I know, I know, you have some real world experience as well. But, ask yourself this (‘cos others will be a damn sight more forceful than I ‘in due season’) . . . what do you really know of, say, the actual affects of the operation of the current family law regime on the people ensnared in its pernicious viscitudes? From where do you get those insights? Do you really place internet filters above the circumstances faced daily by the First People of Australia; irrespective of where they might live? Have you any insight into the critical cultural nuances and imperatives that systemically impair the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, yes, living even in Fraser? How can you be certain that your world view isn’t imbued with a permanent patina courtesy of your legal academic background? Just askin’ . . .

Just so you know . . . I am not a party operative (though I have been). But I am aware enough to know why I (and my social circle) have abandoned the mainstream parties: same reasons the electorate has. Question is, are you?

georgesgenitals georgesgenitals 3:37 pm 03 Mar 11

troysimp said :

georgesgenitals said :

Good stuff Troy.

georgesgenitals: My favourite message so far! Thank you for your encouragement.

🙂

You and I have actually met and spoken, and I thought you were pretty switched on.

I don’t live in your area, but I hope you get a guernsey.

Cheers.

troysimp troysimp 2:28 pm 03 Mar 11

Kan said :

troysimp said :

Kan said :

Yes the major parties do need a shake up in the ACT but you sound very GREEN to me. A bit like Andrew Wilkie who claims to be independent but is really an extra vote for Bob Brown and co. I agree with Bosworth, I will need to see real policies before I can make a decision.

@Kan: As with Bosworth, you will be able to read all my policy positions over time. You can then decide whether I am “Green”, “Red”, or “Blue”. I prefer Purple.

I prefer tangarine.

Tangarine was my second choice.

troysimp troysimp 2:27 pm 03 Mar 11

gordonjameswatson said :

Troy, i think you can bring a lot to Australian politics, i admire your honesty and your progressive views on a number of issues, particularly the republic and same sex marriages. I think any one who decides to stand for office, no matter what side of politics they are on, deserves admiration for wanting to at least serve their community, but for also standing behind their passion – and that takes guts and determination.

Thank you, Gordon. I am extremely grateful for your support. You had better watch out, though: you might receive a letter from your Party asking you to concentrate on letterboxing pamphlets and organising cake stalls rather than engaging in open, public, and honest policy debate 😉

Kan Kan 2:27 pm 03 Mar 11

troysimp said :

Kan said :

Yes the major parties do need a shake up in the ACT but you sound very GREEN to me. A bit like Andrew Wilkie who claims to be independent but is really an extra vote for Bob Brown and co. I agree with Bosworth, I will need to see real policies before I can make a decision.

@Kan: As with Bosworth, you will be able to read all my policy positions over time. You can then decide whether I am “Green”, “Red”, or “Blue”. I prefer Purple.

I prefer tangarine.

troysimp troysimp 2:24 pm 03 Mar 11

triffid said :

troysimp said :

Thanks for your feedback. I do have some lived experience to add to the mix — eg, the day-to-day running of a small business, the challenges of writing and getting books published (these are not law books, but rather humour books), some experience in caring for the sick and support for the mentally ill, etc. And I will be posting on my website soon the philosophical bedrock on which I will base my decision-making. One of the principles that will guide me is diversity of experience and perspectives. So, please do continue contributing your ideas and knowledge.

OK, fair enough. I will look forward to that with interest. But (and without wishing to rush to the last page of any manifesto currently in draft), can you indicate to me just what (and maybe a little of how and why) you might prefer to see occuring in the following public policy areas?:
A) family law
B) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs
C) tax transfers in the context of social equity / inclusion

As Kevin Rudd might say, “in due season”. Right now, it’s Internet filters and parralel importation of books. But your issues are definitely on my list.

gordonjameswatson gordonjameswatson 1:37 pm 03 Mar 11

Troy, i think you can bring a lot to Australian politics, i admire your honesty and your progressive views on a number of issues, particularly the republic and same sex marriages. I think any one who decides to stand for office, no matter what side of politics they are on, deserves admiration for wanting to at least serve their community, but for also standing behind their passion – and that takes guts and determination.

triffid triffid 11:53 am 03 Mar 11

troysimp said :

Thanks for your feedback. I do have some lived experience to add to the mix — eg, the day-to-day running of a small business, the challenges of writing and getting books published (these are not law books, but rather humour books), some experience in caring for the sick and support for the mentally ill, etc. And I will be posting on my website soon the philosophical bedrock on which I will base my decision-making. One of the principles that will guide me is diversity of experience and perspectives. So, please do continue contributing your ideas and knowledge.

OK, fair enough. I will look forward to that with interest. But (and without wishing to rush to the last page of any manifesto currently in draft), can you indicate to me just what (and maybe a little of how and why) you might prefer to see occuring in the following public policy areas?:
A) family law
B) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs
C) tax transfers in the context of social equity / inclusion

troysimp troysimp 11:35 am 03 Mar 11

triffid said :

Well, good luck with all that, Troy. But, personally, I think we have more than enough lawyers in the House of Reps, thanks (and in the building / bureaucracy generally come to think of it). Rather, I’m looking for more sociologists, or anthropologists, or other ‘arts’ type qualifications (even train drivers) instead of just another highly credentialed laywer or economist.

Yes, I’m ‘over’ machine politics and the churlish, infantile pap that passes for politics just as much as the next member of the electorate. But, I know the answer isn’t ‘more independents’ (we did that before Federation . . . it was hardly a success, then, and would be less so now in my informed view). And, I am tired of seeing the same ‘ole, same ‘ole critical perspectives being applied to so many areas of public policy; which critical perspectives deriving from a public sphere posited deep within the habitus to be found at the intersection of the legal (as dictinct from an experienced-at-first-hand ‘social’), the academic (as distinct from the practical) and the economic (you’re a constitutional lawyer, Troy . . . where in the Constitution does it say we have to, as a nation, make a profit?).

So — while not wishing to be overly negative, or to rain on your parade — it will take a great deal of convincing before this little black duck would see your candidacy and policies as truly representing a credible, viable alternative (rather than a selected grab bag of policy positions resting on an ideologically confused bedrock). But, you may as well what you’re up against. (And that’s as much my post grad quals in political science talking as my disdain for contemporary Australian politics).

Thanks for your feedback. I do have some lived experience to add to the mix — eg, the day-to-day running of a small business, the challenges of writing and getting books published (these are not law books, but rather humour books), some experience in caring for the sick and support for the mentally ill, etc. And I will be posting on my website soon the philosophical bedrock on which I will base my decision-making. One of the principles that will guide me is diversity of experience and perspectives. So, please do continue contributing your ideas and knowledge.

triffid triffid 11:04 am 03 Mar 11

Well, good luck with all that, Troy. But, personally, I think we have more than enough lawyers in the House of Reps, thanks (and in the building / bureaucracy generally come to think of it). Rather, I’m looking for more sociologists, or anthropologists, or other ‘arts’ type qualifications (even train drivers) instead of just another highly credentialed laywer or economist.

Yes, I’m ‘over’ machine politics and the churlish, infantile pap that passes for politics just as much as the next member of the electorate. But, I know the answer isn’t ‘more independents’ (we did that before Federation . . . it was hardly a success, then, and would be less so now in my informed view). And, I am tired of seeing the same ‘ole, same ‘ole critical perspectives being applied to so many areas of public policy; which critical perspectives deriving from a public sphere posited deep within the habitus to be found at the intersection of the legal (as dictinct from an experienced-at-first-hand ‘social’), the academic (as distinct from the practical) and the economic (you’re a constitutional lawyer, Troy . . . where in the Constitution does it say we have to, as a nation, make a profit?).

So — while not wishing to be overly negative, or to rain on your parade — it will take a great deal of convincing before this little black duck would see your candidacy and policies as truly representing a credible, viable alternative (rather than a selected grab bag of policy positions resting on an ideologically confused bedrock). But, you may as well what you’re up against. (And that’s as much my post grad quals in political science talking as my disdain for contemporary Australian politics).

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