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Staffies and Kelpies leading the turnover at the RSPCA

By johnboy 5 January 2009 75

My own “Rescue Kelpie” is snoring at my feet as I type (a rescue kelpie does not rescue anything, but rather is rescued), he’s doing an improving line in fetching the ball but otherwise remains of few achievements.

Today the RSPCA has released its statistics on what dogs make up most of their business.

Staffies and Kelpies are notable for heading the lists.

Michael Linke is keen to note that the RSPCA in the ACT has the best rate of finding homes for dogs in the country.

UPDATE: Thanks to Dexi for sending in a picture of their staffy for the purpose of discussion.

Also Bloodnut has YouTubed video of his obedient stafford (he’s keen on the distinction) Persi.

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Staffies and Kelpies leading the turnover at the RSPCA
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burkes08 6:55 pm 30 Jul 11

Yeah, it can be enough, it just depends on the individual temperament of the dog. Often you can replace walking with a good training session instead. A good training session will tire the dog mentally, which can be as effective as lots of walking.

If you are still concerned though, maybe you could look for a rescue dog that is in foster care rather than a shelter, that way the foster carer will be totally sure of what exercise the dogs requires.

Try ACT Rescue and Foster – http://www.fosterdogs.org

Watson 6:00 pm 30 Jul 11

Darnit, I didn’t mean to quote that…

Watson 6:00 pm 30 Jul 11

threepaws said :

From the RSPCA policies:

7.8 Dangerous dogs

7.8.1 RSPCA Australia defines a dangerous dog as any dog which aggressively attacks a person or other animal causing physical injury or death, or behaves in a manner that a reasonable person would believe poses an unjustified imminent threat of physical injury or death.

7.8.2 Exceptions to this definition should be considered where a dog has been clearly provoked into attacking a human or other animal in self-defence, defence of a human or their property, or where a dog kept as a companion animal instinctively attacks an animal normally considered as prey.

7.8.3 RSPCA Australia considers that any dog of any size, breed or mixture of breeds may be dangerous and thus dogs should not be declared dangerous on the basis of breed.

7.8.4 However, it is recognised that there is a strong genetic component in a dog’s propensity for aggressive behaviour, their trigger point for aggression and their capacity to inflict serious injury. These factors should be taken into consideration when choosing a suitable dog and in their subsequent socialisation and training.

7.8.5 RSPCA Australia supports the use in legislation of the category of ‘menacing dog’ to apply to dogs that have repeatedly exhibited threatening behaviour (such as rushing at or chasing a person without provocation), but do not meet the definition of a dangerous dog.

7.8.6 Reducing the incidence of dog attacks requires the following actions:

education of dog owners on the importance of responsible pet ownership and appropriate socialisation and training of dogs

education of the public on understanding dog behaviour and the risks of dog bites

early identification and appropriate management of problem behaviours

selection of dogs on the basis of appropriate behavioural characteristics

the implementation of appropriate control and management programs for those dogs that are declared to be menacing or dangerous.

I realise this is an old post (came up in a Google search), but there seem to be a few kelpie or kelpie cross owners here, so I’d thought I’d ask your advice.

I went to the RSPCA this morning, told the carer what my requirements were for a dog and a bit about our lifestyle and ended up meeting this chap: http://www.adoptapet.com.au/animal/animalDetails.asp?animalid=168407&result=18&statusID=3

They claimed that they couldn’t pick what breed he is, but after looking at a few pics I am convinced her has quite a bit of kelpie in him.

I always swore I would not get a working dog or part working dog as I work away from home for 30hrs a week. But the RSPCA woman seemed to think that it wouldn’t be an issue with this dog if I made sure I gave him the right toys while I was away.

He seems to tick all the boxes, but it is hard to know if it’s going to work.

I do walk my dog twice a day religiously, include them in everything we do at home and try take them everywhere with us if possible. Our previous dog was taken on camping holidays a few times a year, rabbit chasing on weekends, lake and river during summer…

But… a kelpie cross? Will it be enough?

threepaws 12:37 pm 08 Jan 09

From the RSPCA policies:

7.8 Dangerous dogs

7.8.1 RSPCA Australia defines a dangerous dog as any dog which aggressively attacks a person or other animal causing physical injury or death, or behaves in a manner that a reasonable person would believe poses an unjustified imminent threat of physical injury or death.

7.8.2 Exceptions to this definition should be considered where a dog has been clearly provoked into attacking a human or other animal in self-defence, defence of a human or their property, or where a dog kept as a companion animal instinctively attacks an animal normally considered as prey.

7.8.3 RSPCA Australia considers that any dog of any size, breed or mixture of breeds may be dangerous and thus dogs should not be declared dangerous on the basis of breed.

7.8.4 However, it is recognised that there is a strong genetic component in a dog’s propensity for aggressive behaviour, their trigger point for aggression and their capacity to inflict serious injury. These factors should be taken into consideration when choosing a suitable dog and in their subsequent socialisation and training.

7.8.5 RSPCA Australia supports the use in legislation of the category of ‘menacing dog’ to apply to dogs that have repeatedly exhibited threatening behaviour (such as rushing at or chasing a person without provocation), but do not meet the definition of a dangerous dog.

7.8.6 Reducing the incidence of dog attacks requires the following actions:

education of dog owners on the importance of responsible pet ownership and appropriate socialisation and training of dogs

education of the public on understanding dog behaviour and the risks of dog bites

early identification and appropriate management of problem behaviours

selection of dogs on the basis of appropriate behavioural characteristics

the implementation of appropriate control and management programs for those dogs that are declared to be menacing or dangerous.

tylersmayhem 12:31 pm 08 Jan 09

@prhhcd:

Nice post! Spot on!

prhhcd 11:05 am 08 Jan 09

Hey guys. thought I’d put my 2 cents in. I have a cattle dog (who is actually at the vet right now, being desexed) and she is WONDERFUL. I love her so much and she is so good with my cat and ferrets!
Yes, she doesn’t get to herd cattle but walking and daily playing with her and she seems really happy. It does take a lot of effort though – every day. Not just when I’m in the mood! Puppy classes really help too.
Most dogs, irrespective of breed are lovely. Actually that goes for all animals as far as I’m concerned BUT they do need to be trained, need to know who the alpha is and be properly exercised etc. Staffys and Kelpies get bred a lot by backyard breeders, I think that is why there are so many at the RSPCA. It is a real shame because they all deserve a decent life. ADF and CARA do a FANTASTIC job around Canberra as well. So if you’re thinking of getting a dog, please contact them, and don’t encourage backyard breeders or pet shops.
Have a happy new year everyone!

bloodnut 8:02 pm 07 Jan 09

>You know it makes sense

refer to my earlier explanation between staffords and what most bogans have – stafford crosses with poor temperament. By breed standard this actually disqualifies them as staffords. They are bitsers plain and simple. refer also to my comments on your probable lack of knowledge of dog breeds.

mine makes more sense.

>Interesting to find out the breed?!

Disappointed to tell you they were bull mastiff crosses – refer to my original comments on crosses.

tylersmayhem 2:21 pm 07 Jan 09

Presuming they used a vet, wouldn’t the vet have had some say in this? Can a vet report this type of behaviour, rather than being an accomplice to it.
I’m sure Dr Phillip Neitche wouldn’t agree to assisted euthanasia if a person was simply a burden to their carers.

No, unfortunately vets have no say in these decisions. They can choose not to perform the procedure though. Because household pets are deemed “property” of the owner, the owner has the say. Given a situation described to me by the carer of the kitten we just took proud ownership of, vets should have a say, or at very least the morals to not assist.

my wife has a great defence for that type of attack. we don’t let the kids anywhere near dogs.

Best defence mate – your missus has the right idea!

The Brad 2:09 pm 07 Jan 09

I’ve even seen on one occasion when the owner opted to have the dog put down rather than re homed.

Presuming they used a vet, wouldn’t the vet have had some say in this? Can a vet report this type of behaviour, rather than being an accomplice to it.
I’m sure Dr Phillip Neitche wouldn’t agree to assisted euthanasia if a person was simply a burden to their carers.

peterh 2:03 pm 07 Jan 09

ant said :

tylersmayhem said :

Interesting to find out the breed?!

It was probably a chihuahua. They’re not unpredictable around kids; they’re very predictable. See kid, get close to kid, bite kid. My current boy even watches until their parents aren’t looking, and then launches his attack.

my wife has a great defence for that type of attack. we don’t let the kids anywhere near dogs.

ant 1:56 pm 07 Jan 09

tylersmayhem said :

Interesting to find out the breed?!

It was probably a chihuahua. They’re not unpredictable around kids; they’re very predictable. See kid, get close to kid, bite kid. My current boy even watches until their parents aren’t looking, and then launches his attack.

tylersmayhem 1:54 pm 07 Jan 09

they also dig holes in the backyard as they would out on a property. to get cool. I have seen dogs create elaborate holes around an old tree on a sheep property so as to ensure there was always somewhere for them to be out of the sun. man made structures just don’t seem to have the same effect.

Yes, another good point – but with the same effect of several owners disowning them because of this “inconvenient” behaviour.

peterh 1:38 pm 07 Jan 09

tylersmayhem said :

<No, if you actually read my original statement, it implies that many Canberrans buy sheep dogs THEN wonder why they dig up backyards. If you choose that to mean ALL owners of sheep dogs, then that’s your choice I suppose. You sound like a responsible dog owner who chose to buy a breed that likes plenty of activity to suit your lifestyle – therefore would unlikely be digging up your backyard out of unspent energy or boredom, and leaving you wondering why.

Seeing the difference yet?

I have seen it time and time again when a sheep dog dog has been hit by a car because it loves chasing the wheels. I’ve seen many a backyard ripped apart by a bored sheep dog because the lazy owners can’t be f**ked giving them the exercise they need. I’ve even seen on one occasion when the owner opted to have the dog put down rather than re homed.

So yes, I chose the term “morons” very carefully. Sorry if you want to lump yourself in there with them Deezagood!

they also dig holes in the backyard as they would out on a property. to get cool. I have seen dogs create elaborate holes around an old tree on a sheep property so as to ensure there was always somewhere for them to be out of the sun. man made structures just don’t seem to have the same effect.

tylersmayhem 1:26 pm 07 Jan 09

Kind of on-topic / off-topic:

Child killed by dog
January 7, 2009, 12:00 pm

It’s understood a three-year-old has been killed by a dog in New South Wales.

It happened at Whitton, near Griffith, in the south west of the state.

Another child has been wounded, with injuries to the face and body, and is being treated in hospital.

An adult is also thought to have been attacked but does not have life threatening injuries.

Interesting to find out the breed?!

tylersmayhem 11:34 am 07 Jan 09

That isn’t a fair comment; you are implying that having a cattle dog in a suburban Canberra yard automatically makes you an ‘ignorant moron’. We adopted an active dog to suit our active lifestyle and our little Kelpie cross gets run for at least 40 kms a week and has plenty of stimulation and exercise. A less active dog just wouldn’t work with our family; we made a deliberate choice to get an active breed. We also took her to obedience classes to ensure that she can obey basic commands etc… and she is just perfect with the kids. As for kids being rough with dogs, I taught my kids from a very early age to be respectful of all animals and extremely gentle with our dogs. I trust my dogs with the kids but more importantly, I completely trust my kids with the dogs. That said, the dogs are secured away from any visiting children who may not be as well ‘trained’.

No, if you actually read my original statement, it implies that many Canberrans buy sheep dogs THEN wonder why they dig up backyards. If you choose that to mean ALL owners of sheep dogs, then that’s your choice I suppose. You sound like a responsible dog owner who chose to buy a breed that likes plenty of activity to suit your lifestyle – therefore would unlikely be digging up your backyard out of unspent energy or boredom, and leaving you wondering why.

Seeing the difference yet?

I have seen it time and time again when a sheep dog dog has been hit by a car because it loves chasing the wheels. I’ve seen many a backyard ripped apart by a bored sheep dog because the lazy owners can’t be f**ked giving them the exercise they need. I’ve even seen on one occasion when the owner opted to have the dog put down rather than re homed.

So yes, I chose the term “morons” very carefully. Sorry if you want to lump yourself in there with them Deezagood!

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