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Barr seeks relief on ACT’s high petrol prices

By Michael Reid 15 June 2016 42

man filling up at petrol station

ACT chief minister Andrew Barr on Wednesday met with Australian Consumer and Competition Commission chair Rod Sims to discuss high petrol prices faced by Canberra motorists.

The ACT is continually recording higher petrol prices than other large cities across the country, Barr said.

In February 2016, Canberra motorists saw record petrol price differentials compared with the national average and Sydney, in particular.

These record prices were despite a continued decrease in crude oil prices late last year, which reached their lowest level since June 2004.

While the situation improved a little in the March quarter, the figures reveal a large discrepancy between the cost of crude oil and what motorists are paying for petrol.

Market study

“It is important our fuel retailers are held to account to ensure that Canberrans aren’t paying too much at the pump,” Barr said.

“Canberra motorists in and around Majura Park and Fyshwick have had some petrol price relief with the opening of Costco and Metro Petroleum. Unfortunately, these savings have not yet flowed through to the broader ACT market.”

Barr said he has discussed with Sims ways to increase competition and transparency in the market, and the need for the commission to conduct a market study into petrol prices in the ACT.

“The government will work closely with the ACCC to provide better information to consumers and to collect better data. The ACT will also work with other states – raising these issues at the next head of Treasuries meeting,” Barr added.

“A 2015 investigation into petrol prices in Darwin and market studies in Launceston and Armidale led to downward pressure on petrol prices in the Northern Territory, Tasmania and New South Wales.

“The government will continue to work with the ACCC to ease the strain on the ACT community caused by rising petrol prices.”


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Barr seeks relief on ACT’s high petrol prices
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dungfungus 9:16 am 21 Jun 16

dungfungus said :

Apparently 1 bonus feature of the Tesla, we can use it to cross lake george when it floods!

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2016/06/tesla-model-s-floats-boat-video/

Lake George doesn’t “flood”, it fills and empties and there are no roads across it so why would anyone want to attempt it anyway?
The Tesla, like any other car, would be “all at sea” if it floated on a river crossing. I foolishly attempted a crossing of a fast flowing creek near Merriwa once and the VW 1500 I was driving started to bounce and float but the motor kept going. I was able to reach the other side about 50 metres downstream fortunately and although there was water inside the car the motor never once stopped.

Mordd 12:04 am 21 Jun 16

Apparently 1 bonus feature of the Tesla, we can use it to cross lake george when it floods!

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2016/06/tesla-model-s-floats-boat-video/

gazket 10:51 pm 20 Jun 16

what is Barr or the ACCC going too do ?

Are they going to stand up in Federal Parliment and give the Federal politicians a dressing down for letting most of our our fuel refineries be run down to a unfixable state and close down. Forcing Australia to import more fuel every year which is nearly 50% of capacity .

This will only increase in price as we leave ourselves to the mercy of other countries wanting their crews to make $20 a day to deliver fuel petrol and Most importantly Diesel to Australia.

How this situation is good for our “National Interests” has got me buggered .

Lets hope we are not caught being cruel to Fossil fuels and have Singapore put a ban on fuel exports to Australia because we will be screwed well and truly. The whole country will bring to a stop in a few days.

Petrol ULP 91 is $1:13 if you’re paying more you have more money than brains .

ACT fuel watch is hopeless as you need to register to see the prices
How about a web page you can just open with adding your email details for a flood of spam phishing scams.

gooterz 8:19 pm 20 Jun 16

theword said :

TuggLife said :

Fancy that! Technology that’s so far past the early-adopter period and now approaching its obsolescence is cheaper than new technology…

TuggLife said :

But I’m not about to pretend that electric vehicles are a passing fad. I don’t understand the reluctance of many people to hold so desperately onto inefficient, wasteful, and environmentally detrimental technology in the fact of a better alternative (even if it’s still in its infancy).

New technology? Still in its infancy?
History of the electric car:
http://www.electricauto.org/?page=evhistory
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_electric_vehicle
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_automobile

Just sayin’, batteries are not exactly “new technology” in “its infancy” either. There are probably other reasons why we don’t have them driving around everywhere (cheap oil being one).
I’m not really for or against EV, but new they are not.

All the cars on the moon in 1969 were electic.
We don’t need no stinkin’ rail.

JC 7:34 pm 20 Jun 16

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

It’s easy to spot the people who don’t know anything about the new generation of electric vehicles.

The range of the Teslas is over 400km. Do you know that Sydney is actually quite a lot less than 400km away? And for the paranoid among you, there’s a Tesla supercharging station in Goulburn, and 2 in Sydney.

To get a range of 400km in an electric car, you first need to invest at least $130,000 for the car and appropriately sized battery. Not exactly economical on the budget, even if you get recharged for free. That $100,000 would buy a whole lot of range for an economical 4 banger.
What do you do if you have to wait for other people to finish charging before you get your turn to have a 1 hour break? What if you are in a hurry and can’t wait? What about having to reduce your highway speed to 95km/h because your car is saying you won’t make it to the next recharge at the speed limit? Sounds like a lot of inconvenience to me, might as well take a train.

What do you do if your petrol car gets a spare tyre? What happens when there’s no spare? What happens when the head gasket blows and the car can’t be driven any more? What do you do if you’re on empty and the only service station for 100km has run out of petrol?

The reason it “sounds like a lot of inconvenience” to you is because you’re intentionally thinking of the worst case scenarios and implying they’ll be regular occasions.

And that $130,000 car is actually more comparable to a $200,000 BMW or Mercedes when you consider features and performance. You won’t get an “economical 4 banger” that even comes close to the performance and features of the Model S. But don’t worry, cheaper ones are on the way.

Only a fool would contemplate driving a car without a flat tyre and in my lifetime I have driven about 2 million kilometres and I have never blown a head gasket.
I have experienced quite a few flat batteries though.
And while I am aware that the Tesla has exhilarating acceleration and “performance”, so what?

Surprised you are so anti electric car there dungers. After all they are cars which will help the love affair with more and bigger roads plus they are power by electricity which comes from those coal powered stations you love so much. So win win is it not?

sputnik 3:22 pm 20 Jun 16

TuggLife said :

Fancy that! Technology that’s so far past the early-adopter period and now approaching its obsolescence is cheaper than new technology…

TuggLife said :

But I’m not about to pretend that electric vehicles are a passing fad. I don’t understand the reluctance of many people to hold so desperately onto inefficient, wasteful, and environmentally detrimental technology in the fact of a better alternative (even if it’s still in its infancy).

New technology? Still in its infancy?
History of the electric car:
http://www.electricauto.org/?page=evhistory
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_electric_vehicle
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_automobile

Just sayin’, batteries are not exactly “new technology” in “its infancy” either. There are probably other reasons why we don’t have them driving around everywhere (cheap oil being one).
I’m not really for or against EV, but new they are not.

JessP 3:10 pm 20 Jun 16

Who needs cheap petrol when we will soon have a tram that will solve all our problems!

dungfungus 12:13 pm 20 Jun 16

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

It’s easy to spot the people who don’t know anything about the new generation of electric vehicles.

The range of the Teslas is over 400km. Do you know that Sydney is actually quite a lot less than 400km away? And for the paranoid among you, there’s a Tesla supercharging station in Goulburn, and 2 in Sydney.

To get a range of 400km in an electric car, you first need to invest at least $130,000 for the car and appropriately sized battery. Not exactly economical on the budget, even if you get recharged for free. That $100,000 would buy a whole lot of range for an economical 4 banger.
What do you do if you have to wait for other people to finish charging before you get your turn to have a 1 hour break? What if you are in a hurry and can’t wait? What about having to reduce your highway speed to 95km/h because your car is saying you won’t make it to the next recharge at the speed limit? Sounds like a lot of inconvenience to me, might as well take a train.

What do you do if your petrol car gets a spare tyre? What happens when there’s no spare? What happens when the head gasket blows and the car can’t be driven any more? What do you do if you’re on empty and the only service station for 100km has run out of petrol?

The reason it “sounds like a lot of inconvenience” to you is because you’re intentionally thinking of the worst case scenarios and implying they’ll be regular occasions.

And that $130,000 car is actually more comparable to a $200,000 BMW or Mercedes when you consider features and performance. You won’t get an “economical 4 banger” that even comes close to the performance and features of the Model S. But don’t worry, cheaper ones are on the way.

Only a fool would contemplate driving a car without a flat tyre and in my lifetime I have driven about 2 million kilometres and I have never blown a head gasket.
I have experienced quite a few flat batteries though.
And while I am aware that the Tesla has exhilarating acceleration and “performance”, so what?

Mysteryman 10:43 am 20 Jun 16

wildturkeycanoe said :

Maya123 said :

It’s easy to spot the people who don’t know anything about the new generation of electric vehicles.

The range of the Teslas is over 400km. Do you know that Sydney is actually quite a lot less than 400km away? And for the paranoid among you, there’s a Tesla supercharging station in Goulburn, and 2 in Sydney.

To get a range of 400km in an electric car, you first need to invest at least $130,000 for the car and appropriately sized battery. Not exactly economical on the budget, even if you get recharged for free. That $100,000 would buy a whole lot of range for an economical 4 banger.
What do you do if you have to wait for other people to finish charging before you get your turn to have a 1 hour break? What if you are in a hurry and can’t wait? What about having to reduce your highway speed to 95km/h because your car is saying you won’t make it to the next recharge at the speed limit? Sounds like a lot of inconvenience to me, might as well take a train.

What do you do if your petrol car gets a flat tyre? What happens when there’s no spare? What happens when the head gasket blows and the car can’t be driven any more? What do you do if you’re on empty and the only service station for 100km has run out of petrol?

The reason it “sounds like a lot of inconvenience” to you is because you’re intentionally thinking of the worst case scenarios and implying they’ll be regular occasions.

And that $130,000 car is actually more comparable to a $200,000 BMW or Mercedes when you consider features and performance. You won’t get an “economical 4 banger” that even comes close to the performance and features of the Model S. But don’t worry, cheaper ones are on the way.

dungfungus 9:22 am 20 Jun 16

BlowMeDown said :

I don’t want to rain on your parade here, but I can remember when the “pro-business” Carnell Liberal government took office in 1995 petrol prices increased almost 20 cents per litre overnight. I also remember how she put a levy on petrol to fund the Canberra Hospital redevelopment, a levy that stayed after the project was finished and which we are still paying today.

If that was so, then Carnell’s Liberals were voted out. I wonder if Barr’s ACT Labor/Greens will be voted out ???

As a ACT ratepayer, Im just so sick and tired of ACT Government(s) treating their constituents and Ratepayers with such contempt – and as financial milking cows. If by some fluke, ACT Lib’s do form Government here but then do not deliver the goods, then I also hope they are voted out in 2020.

200 years ago the ACT was covered in sheep heards. 200 years later.. nothing has changed

I don’t think sheep were on the Limestone Plains 200 years ago but your point is not lost.
Lets assume they were and they were all calling out baa, baa then.
The only subtle change to that is that today’s sheep call out Barr, Barr.

gooterz 10:27 pm 19 Jun 16

I don’t want to rain on your parade here, but I can remember when the “pro-business” Carnell Liberal government took office in 1995 petrol prices increased almost 20 cents per litre overnight. I also remember how she put a levy on petrol to fund the Canberra Hospital redevelopment, a levy that stayed after the project was finished and which we are still paying today.

If that was so, then Carnell’s Liberals were voted out. I wonder if Barr’s ACT Labor/Greens will be voted out ???

As a ACT ratepayer, Im just so sick and tired of ACT Government(s) treating their constituents and Ratepayers with such contempt – and as financial milking cows. If by some fluke, ACT Lib’s do form Government here but then do not deliver the goods, then I also hope they are voted out in 2020.

200 years ago the ACT was covered in sheep heards. 200 years later.. nothing has changed

dungfungus 9:34 am 18 Jun 16

greenbamboo said :

There is one more reason we are still stuck with petrol and diesel as our primary modes of propulsion, CO2 emissions. It might sound green to be driving an electric car around, but due to the lack of widely abundant green energy [And the additional fact that green means that someone agreed to plant trees in order to offset the emissions from their dirty power, rather than actually produce green power ] most owners will find they are filling up on coal powered electricity. The amount of coal required to provide the charge in a battery to drive an electric vehicle, is equivalent to or even more than the released CO2 from burning fossil fuels in a petrol equivalent.
So man has come up with a way to use green energy, that is great! Now we just need to find a way to produce more of it. Then we can begin to eliminate fossil fuels and their byproducts.
Interesting that if a petrol car uses about 6litres per 100km, it’d cost about $7.20 as opposed to $4.50 for electric. But if the tariffs were removed from petrol, it would be cheaper to use the liquid form. I wonder how long after electric becomes the norm, that we will see more taxes and levies applied to electricity?

Ouch! The greenies won’t like that.
Let’s face it, electric cars are preferred by the trendoids because they are cool and that’s about it.

wildturkeycanoe 7:33 pm 17 Jun 16

There is one more reason we are still stuck with petrol and diesel as our primary modes of propulsion, CO2 emissions. It might sound green to be driving an electric car around, but due to the lack of widely abundant green energy [And the additional fact that green means that someone agreed to plant trees in order to offset the emissions from their dirty power, rather than actually produce green power ] most owners will find they are filling up on coal powered electricity. The amount of coal required to provide the charge in a battery to drive an electric vehicle, is equivalent to or even more than the released CO2 from burning fossil fuels in a petrol equivalent.
So man has come up with a way to use green energy, that is great! Now we just need to find a way to produce more of it. Then we can begin to eliminate fossil fuels and their byproducts.
Interesting that if a petrol car uses about 6litres per 100km, it’d cost about $7.20 as opposed to $4.50 for electric. But if the tariffs were removed from petrol, it would be cheaper to use the liquid form. I wonder how long after electric becomes the norm, that we will see more taxes and levies applied to electricity?

rommeldog56 3:47 pm 17 Jun 16

I don’t want to rain on your parade here, but I can remember when the “pro-business” Carnell Liberal government took office in 1995 petrol prices increased almost 20 cents per litre overnight. I also remember how she put a levy on petrol to fund the Canberra Hospital redevelopment, a levy that stayed after the project was finished and which we are still paying today.

If that was so, then Carnell’s Liberals were voted out. I wonder if Barr’s ACT Labor/Greens will be voted out ???

As a ACT ratepayer, Im just so sick and tired of ACT Government(s) treating their constituents and Ratepayers with such contempt – and as financial milking cows. If by some fluke, ACT Lib’s do form Government here but then do not deliver the goods, then I also hope they are voted out in 2020.

Mysteryman 2:20 pm 17 Jun 16

dungfungus said :

rommeldog56 said :

Mordd said :

Maya123 said :

Mordd said :

Can’t compare standard el cheapo car against a top of the line Tesla. The new Model 3 will be priced at USD35,000 (local price due next year). Tesla also provide an 8-year battery warranty.

You also cannot compare a car that cannot even make it to Sydney without stopping for a few hours to charge the battery, to any liquid propelled transport. For commuting they have their place but for any travel outside Australian towns or cities they are no substitute.
There are significant hurdles to overcome before electric cars make petrol a thing of the past, range being the major one and charging another complicated problem. Providing charging stations for everyone to use is a massive task in terms of scale, requiring outlets, a means to measure the kWh and bill people for usage and all the extra load being put on our electricity grid infrastructure. I wonder how much of an electric car’s driveable range is eaten up by defrosting the windows on a sub zero morning, by cranking the heater on the way to your destination, by running the air conditioning in summer to avoid heatstroke? Petrol cars will be around for some time to come.

It’s easy to spot the people who don’t know anything about the new generation of electric vehicles.

The range of the Teslas is over 400km. Do you know that Sydney is actually quite a lot less than 400km away? And for the paranoid among you, there’s a Tesla supercharging station in Goulburn, and 2 in Sydney.

My 2.0 litre petrol turbo (cost $11K second hand) can go to Albury and back (660km) on a full tank and still have 120km range left after returning from Albury.

Fancy that! Technology that’s so far past the early-adopter period and now approaching its obsolescence is cheaper than new technology…

It’s great that you like your car and that it gets good distance. But that doesn’t prove that electric vehicles are useless for distance driving. There’s already enough charging stations between Sydney and Melbourne to make the trip comfortably in a Tesla, in the same amount of time as the average trip in a combustion engined vehicle. Electrics won’t be suited to all needs initially, but for the vast majority of motorists they are already be more than adequate.

“cheaper than new technology” applies to most of us.
You may be able to afford the indulgence of an electric car but most of us (that’s the vast majority of motorists to you) can’t.
As a matter of interest, what type of electric car do you drive?

I can’t afford one yet. But I recognise their potential and I think they are absolutely the next step forward. Especially as governments are pressured to move towards renewable energy. Countries in Europe are moving towards phasing out new consumer combustion engine vehicles in the next 2 decades. And considering the increasingly strict European emissions standards, we are going to see more push to move towards electric vehicles. Tesla, a fairly new company with no prior experience in making cars, has proven that they can work, and that they can compete in nearly every way with existing luxury cars. That’s an impressive feat. And it won’t stop there.

I love cars and motorcycles. I own one of each. The motorbike is 1000cc. It’s loud and fast and I love it. But I’m not about to pretend that electric vehicles are a passing fad. I don’t understand the reluctance of many people to hold so desperately onto inefficient, wasteful, and environmentally detrimental technology in the fact of a better alternative (even if it’s still in its infancy).

John Moulis 2:17 pm 17 Jun 16

dungfungus said :

Begs the question, why now?

Hasn’t Mr Barr noticed this discrepancy before, but now wants to be seen doing something 4 months from October!

Of course. But the ACT Labor/Greens Gov’t know how gullible and rusted on Labor/Greens ACT voters and Ratepayers are. If we vote ACT Labor/Greens back, this is the sort of insulting politics that we entrench – and would deserve.

I don’t want to rain on your parade here, but I can remember when the “pro-business” Carnell Liberal government took office in 1995 petrol prices increased almost 20 cents per litre overnight. I also remember how she put a levy on petrol to fund the Canberra Hospital redevelopment, a levy that stayed after the project was finished and which we are still paying today.

dungfungus 1:55 pm 17 Jun 16

rommeldog56 said :

Mordd said :

Maya123 said :

Mordd said :

Can’t compare standard el cheapo car against a top of the line Tesla. The new Model 3 will be priced at USD35,000 (local price due next year). Tesla also provide an 8-year battery warranty.

You also cannot compare a car that cannot even make it to Sydney without stopping for a few hours to charge the battery, to any liquid propelled transport. For commuting they have their place but for any travel outside Australian towns or cities they are no substitute.
There are significant hurdles to overcome before electric cars make petrol a thing of the past, range being the major one and charging another complicated problem. Providing charging stations for everyone to use is a massive task in terms of scale, requiring outlets, a means to measure the kWh and bill people for usage and all the extra load being put on our electricity grid infrastructure. I wonder how much of an electric car’s driveable range is eaten up by defrosting the windows on a sub zero morning, by cranking the heater on the way to your destination, by running the air conditioning in summer to avoid heatstroke? Petrol cars will be around for some time to come.

It’s easy to spot the people who don’t know anything about the new generation of electric vehicles.

The range of the Teslas is over 400km. Do you know that Sydney is actually quite a lot less than 400km away? And for the paranoid among you, there’s a Tesla supercharging station in Goulburn, and 2 in Sydney.

My 2.0 litre petrol turbo (cost $11K second hand) can go to Albury and back (660km) on a full tank and still have 120km range left after returning from Albury.

Fancy that! Technology that’s so far past the early-adopter period and now approaching its obsolescence is cheaper than new technology…

It’s great that you like your car and that it gets good distance. But that doesn’t prove that electric vehicles are useless for distance driving. There’s already enough charging stations between Sydney and Melbourne to make the trip comfortably in a Tesla, in the same amount of time as the average trip in a combustion engined vehicle. Electrics won’t be suited to all needs initially, but for the vast majority of motorists they are already be more than adequate.

“cheaper than new technology” applies to most of us.
You may be able to afford the indulgence of an electric car but most of us (that’s the vast majority of motorists to you) can’t.
As a matter of interest, what type of electric car do you drive?

wildturkeycanoe 1:53 pm 17 Jun 16

Maya123 said :

It’s easy to spot the people who don’t know anything about the new generation of electric vehicles.

The range of the Teslas is over 400km. Do you know that Sydney is actually quite a lot less than 400km away? And for the paranoid among you, there’s a Tesla supercharging station in Goulburn, and 2 in Sydney.

To get a range of 400km in an electric car, you first need to invest at least $130,000 for the car and appropriately sized battery. Not exactly economical on the budget, even if you get recharged for free. That $100,000 would buy a whole lot of range for an economical 4 banger.
What do you do if you have to wait for other people to finish charging before you get your turn to have a 1 hour break? What if you are in a hurry and can’t wait? What about having to reduce your highway speed to 95km/h because your car is saying you won’t make it to the next recharge at the speed limit? Sounds like a lot of inconvenience to me, might as well take a train.

Mysteryman 12:32 pm 17 Jun 16

Mordd said :

Maya123 said :

Mordd said :

Can’t compare standard el cheapo car against a top of the line Tesla. The new Model 3 will be priced at USD35,000 (local price due next year). Tesla also provide an 8-year battery warranty.

You also cannot compare a car that cannot even make it to Sydney without stopping for a few hours to charge the battery, to any liquid propelled transport. For commuting they have their place but for any travel outside Australian towns or cities they are no substitute.
There are significant hurdles to overcome before electric cars make petrol a thing of the past, range being the major one and charging another complicated problem. Providing charging stations for everyone to use is a massive task in terms of scale, requiring outlets, a means to measure the kWh and bill people for usage and all the extra load being put on our electricity grid infrastructure. I wonder how much of an electric car’s driveable range is eaten up by defrosting the windows on a sub zero morning, by cranking the heater on the way to your destination, by running the air conditioning in summer to avoid heatstroke? Petrol cars will be around for some time to come.

It’s easy to spot the people who don’t know anything about the new generation of electric vehicles.

The range of the Teslas is over 400km. Do you know that Sydney is actually quite a lot less than 400km away? And for the paranoid among you, there’s a Tesla supercharging station in Goulburn, and 2 in Sydney.

My 2.0 litre petrol turbo (cost $11K second hand) can go to Albury and back (660km) on a full tank and still have 120km range left after returning from Albury.

Fancy that! Technology that’s so far past the early-adopter period and now approaching its obsolescence is cheaper than new technology…

It’s great that you like your car and that it gets good distance. But that doesn’t prove that electric vehicles are useless for distance driving. There’s already enough charging stations between Sydney and Melbourne to make the trip comfortably in a Tesla, in the same amount of time as the average trip in a combustion engined vehicle. Electrics won’t be suited to all needs initially, but for the vast majority of motorists they are already be more than adequate.

dungfungus 11:55 am 17 Jun 16

Maya123 said :

Mordd said :

Can’t compare standard el cheapo car against a top of the line Tesla. The new Model 3 will be priced at USD35,000 (local price due next year). Tesla also provide an 8-year battery warranty.

You also cannot compare a car that cannot even make it to Sydney without stopping for a few hours to charge the battery, to any liquid propelled transport. For commuting they have their place but for any travel outside Australian towns or cities they are no substitute.
There are significant hurdles to overcome before electric cars make petrol a thing of the past, range being the major one and charging another complicated problem. Providing charging stations for everyone to use is a massive task in terms of scale, requiring outlets, a means to measure the kWh and bill people for usage and all the extra load being put on our electricity grid infrastructure. I wonder how much of an electric car’s driveable range is eaten up by defrosting the windows on a sub zero morning, by cranking the heater on the way to your destination, by running the air conditioning in summer to avoid heatstroke? Petrol cars will be around for some time to come.

It’s easy to spot the people who don’t know anything about the new generation of electric vehicles.

The range of the Teslas is over 400km. Do you know that Sydney is actually quite a lot less than 400km away? And for the paranoid among you, there’s a Tesla supercharging station in Goulburn, and 2 in Sydney.

My 2.0 litre petrol turbo (cost $11K second hand) can go to Albury and back (660km) on a full tank and still have 120km range left after returning from Albury.

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